If you are having trouble viewing this newsletter, please click on the link to view: http://www.forestresearch.ca/E_Newsletter/11-09.html
Pour lire la numero en francais cliquez ici


Date: November 2009



Inside this issue:
1. General Manager’s Message

What’s Been Happening?

2. Northeast Core Team Meeting Focuses on Density Management and Thinning
3. FRP E-lecture Series a Hit
4.Teacher's Tour
5. Hybrid Poplar and Norway Spruce Tour
6. Forest Co-op Science Day
7. Knowledge Exchange Planning Meeting at the CEC
8. FPAC Tour and Film Crew
9. Forestry Research Trail
10. FRP in Nanaimo
11.An Intern’s Perspective on visits to Yellow Birch and Red Oak

12.Stand Density Management Diagram download Updated

13. Stand Density Effect on Taper

14.Harnessing Biomass Conference at Nipissing University

Upcoming events:

15. FRP Science Seminars being planned for Petawawa and Timmins

What do you think of our electronic newsletter?

 

Contenu du présent numéro:
1. Message du directeur

Les dernières nouvelles...

2. La rencontre de l’équipe de base du Nord-Est se concentre sur la gestion de la densité et la coupe d’éclaircie
3. La série de cyberconférences du PRF est un succès

4. La tournée des professeurs
5. Visite de peupliers hybrides et d'épinette de Norvège

6. La journée scientifique de la Forest Ecosystem Science Cooperative

7. Rencontre de planification de partage du savoir au Centre écologique du Canada (CEC)
8.
La tournée de l’APFC et l’équipe de tournage
9. Le Sentier de recherche en foresterie

10.Le PRF a Nanaimo

11. Le point de vue d’un stagiaire sur les visites aux sites de recherche du bouleau jaune et du chêne rouge

12. Mise à jour du téléchargement des diagrammes de la gestion de la densité des peuplements

13. Les effets de la densité des peuplements sur la décroissance

14. La conférence sur l’exploitation de la biomasse à l’université de Nipissing

Événements à venir

15.Colloques scientifiques du PRF planifiés à Petawawa et à Timmins

Que pensez-vous de notre cyberbulletin?




General Manager’s Message

General Manager’s Message - Of Core Teams and “Commercial” Thinning


One of the unique features of the Forestry Research Partnership is the direct engagement of scientists with practitioners, as occurs through the use of our “Core Teams”.  At a recent meeting in Chapleau with the planning teams for the Martel Forest, one of the presenters was Dr. Doug Pitt of the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre, who discussed the merits of commercial thinning. The Martel Forest is not unlike many other forests in Ontario and indeed Canada, where first pass harvesting is finishing up in the next 10 to 20 years.  Also like many forests, the Martel is facing a wood supply dip in the next 20 or so years, as the remaining eligible original growth forest is being planned for harvest, while the emerging second growth forest is not quite ready to be harvesteAl Thorned.
Since the early 1970’s, reforestation efforts have been very good on managed forests in Ontario, with many excellent productive stands now ranging between 25 to 40 years of age. Since very little crown land is actively managed ‘post free to grow’, many of these stands are now over stocked and not growing at their prime potential. The science of the value of commercial thinning is well known, as a portion of the stand is selectively removed to provide better growing conditions for the remaining trees, allowing them to grow larger and faster. As a result, this seems to be an ideal solution to help address the pending wood supply shortfall predicted in the next 20 to 30 years.


So why don’t we do more thinning?


I believe the issue is not the science, but the policies; and perhaps the use of the word “commercial”. Forest managers are required to regenerate areas harvested to a free growing condition (i.e. approximately 6’ – 10’ tall and free of threatening competition) as part of their tenure system. It is essentially a cost of doing business. Also, many areas have emerging funds such as Forestry Futures in Ontario, that pay to regenerate areas impacted by fire, insect, and disease, or address other forest health issues. These programs are essentially funded 100% through the Forestry Futures Trust. Commercial thinning falls somewhere in between these cases, in a kind of silvicultural “no man’s land”. While it is true that there is some value in the mainly pulp or biomass quality material that is harvested through a commercial thinning, the value garnered from this material does not cover the costs – even if stumpage rates were $0! This tends to be the case in both good markets and bad.


To address this situation, I would like to propose some sort of public - private funding arrangement where the value of the thinning undertaken today is applied directly to the extra cost needed to do the treatment. For example, if thinnings are worth $25 per tonne produced and it actually costs $40 per tonne to produce, then the extra amount required from the public system would only be $15 per tonne to complete the balance. At the end of the day everyone wins. This could be one of our least expensive forms of silviculture, with one of the biggest returns. We can move a long way to addressing the pending wood supply problem, create desperately needed jobs in the short term, and help support the emerging bio-economy. To kick start this idea, the first thing we need to do is change the name from “commercial” thinning, and remove the misunderstanding that the practice makes money today.

Alan Thorne
General Manager
Forestry Research Partnership

Return to top
 

What’s Been Happening?

Northeast Core Team Meeting Focuses on Density Management and Thinning

On October 1st the FRP’s Superior Core Team met in Chapleau to focus on boreal forest commercial thinning. Presentations by Ken Lennon of OMNR Northeast Science and Information, Peter Newton and Doug Pitt of the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre, and Denis Gagnon of OMNR Northeast Region Planning, as well as a field tour of thinning trials in Mageau Township north of Chapleau, were part of the session. The event was focused and well attended, and helped to clarify and highlight the tools and science around stand density management, and promote the use of pre-commercial and commercial thinning as viable silvicultural options in the boreal forest.


Click here for some photos of the session.
Click here to access the presentations.

Return to top


FRP E-lecture Series a Hit

The Canadian Institute of Forestry’s e-lecture series featuring the Forestry Research Partnership (September-October) was a tremendous success, with participation averaging between 60 and 70 sites. Analysis indicates average participation of 4 to 5 individuals per site. The offer of financial support for a ‘lunch and a lecture’ at the Institute’s Ontario Sections was also used by three sites.
The series included a variety of FRP research projects and their outputs, and received positive critical reception. The PowerPoints and the recordings of the lectures are freely available on the FRP site for download and use for the convenience of those not able to take-in the live lecture.


Click here for a poster of what was presented.
Click here to access the PDF’s of the presentation and the WAV files featuring the presenter.

Return to top


Teachers’ Tour


The annual Forestry Teachers Tour based at the Canadian Ecology Centre was a great success again this past August. The FRP was involved in helping to deliver the event, which included tours of the Red Oak Research site with OMNR’s Southern Science and Information, and a trip down to the Petawawa Research Forest where a number of excellent research installation tours occurred.  Matt Meade provided the FRP’s introductory presentation, called Forestry 101.


Click here for a collage of Teachers’ Tour photos.

Return to top 


Hybrid Poplar and Norway Spruce Tour


The FRP hosted a special biomass tour on September 25th in northeastern Ontario, coinciding with the International Plowing Match in New Liskeard. Site visits included hybrid poplar and Norway spruce trials on several private land plantations. There is much interest in these fast growing species with respect to the potential afforestation of abandoned farm land.


Click here for some photos of the event.

Return to top


Forest Co-op Science Day


On September 30th the Forest Ecosystem Science Cooperative held its annual science day in Sault Ste. Marie. The Forest Co-op continues to oversee and coordinate a number of science and research projects, including several that are linked directly to FRP projects. The FRP will be working to promote continued collaboration and cooperation with the Forest Co-op in the application of science and research that improves sustainable forest practices.

Click here for some photos from the Forest Co-op’s Science Day.
Click here to visit the Forest Co-op’s website.

Return to top


Knowledge Exchange Planning Meeting at the CEC


A knowledge exchange planning meeting was held on September 16th at the CEC, with FRP, Canadian Wood Fibre Centre, FPInnovations and OMNR all represented. Discussion focused on the FRP Extension Plan with respect to the knowledge exchange agreement now in place with FPInnovations, and funding from Canadian Wood Fibre Centre. Guidance was provided on aligning the FRP’s extension activities with Canadian Wood Fibre Centre and FPInnovations strategic priorities relating to optimizing the wood fibre value chain.


Click here for a photo of the meeting.

Return to top


FPAC Tour and Film Crew


On September 15th, a film crew coordinated by FPAC visited the Canadian Ecology Centre and several FRP research sites in and around the Nipissing Forest. The group also included individuals representing several pulp buyers, investigating the environmental sustainability of forestry practices in Canada. Chris McDonell of Tembec coordinated the visit, with Al Stinson, Sue Pickering, John Pineau and John McNutt assisting with the tour.


Click here for some photos of the group and their tour.

Return to top


Forestry Research Trail

Planning for the repair, maintenance and re-interpretation of the Forestry Research Trail in Samuel de Chaplain Provincial Park near the CEC is well underway. The trail, which has seen tens of thousands of visitors since its creation almost 10 years ago, has introduced many to the science behind permanent sample plots and growth and yield. Information on tree species and forest ecosystem processes have also been prominent interpretive themes.  The trail had experienced some damage as a result of weather and normal wear and tear.


New interpretive signs and information will be completed and installed this fall. For more information please contact: mbelanger@canadianecology.ca

Return to top


FRP in Nanaimo


The Partnership was well represented at the CIF/IFC’s annual general meeting and conference in Nanaimo BC during the week of September 21st. Matt Meade and Mat Belanger were both on hand to staff the FRP display booth, and meet delegates from all over Canada.

Return to top



An Intern’s Perspective on visits to Yellow Birch and Red Oak


Following are some thoughts and impressions by our Forest Science and Information Integration Intern – Mat Belanger:


On July 8th the FRP Extension Team met at the CEC, and followed with visits to the Yellow Birch and Red Oak research sites in Phelps and Olrig townships. The Yellow Birch Crop Tree Release Trial and Thinning Study began seven years ago and is regularly visited by forest scientists and practitioners, and also the general public. The site allows the study of the effect of crown closure and release distance on yellow birch regeneration. The Red Oak research site, originally thought to be dominated by red maple, was started six years ago when it was confirmed that it was in fact heavily populated by red oak. Forest science currently lacks understanding and knowledge with respect to the optimal regeneration of red oak. Red Oak is very important for wildlife species such as bear and deer. Current understanding indicates that oak requires fire, and that manual tending is better with less light. Acorns are just as effective as seedlings for regeneration purposes. Results from these studies are still in process, but will undoubtedly provide a comprehensive and sound understanding of optimal Red Oak regeneration.

Return to top



Stand Density Management Diagram download Updated

Click here to download the latest version of the Stand Density Management Diagrams (SMDMs).

 

Return to top


Stand Density Effect on Taper

Click here for a recently released report on the effect of stand density on taper.

Return to top


Harnessing Biomass Conference at Nipissing University


The FRP worked with Nipissing University and a number of partners to help plan and deliver the Harnassing Biomass Conference on October 22nd and 23rd in North Bay. The conference was a practical event that promoted the use of biomass for energy. There were over 450 participants.

Click here for detailed information.
Click here for some photos from the conference.

Return to top


Upcoming Events

FRP Science Seminars being planned for Petawawa and Timmins

The FRP Extension Team is planning two science seminars for the fall, one tentatively scheduled for the northeast in Timmins in mid November focusing on caribou, and the other at the Petawawa Research Forest in mid December that will look at Patchworks use at the Petawawa Research Forest and its potential integration with FPInnovations’ Interface model.
Stay tuned for more details!

Return to top


What do you think of our electronic newsletter?

Please take a few minutes to give us some feedback by sending an email to forest@canadianecology.ca

Please feel free to forward this to any of your colleagues!If you would like to subscribe or unsubscribe to this newsletter please send an email to forest@canadianecology.ca

To view our privacy policy please see our website at www.forestresearch.ca and click on "Privacy Policy" at the top of the page.

Return to top


 


Message du directeur

Message du gérant général

À propos des équipes de base et des coupes d’éclaircie commerciales

Une des caractéristiques uniques du Partenariat pour la recherche forestière est la mobilisation directe des scientifiques avec les praticiens de la foresterie telle qu’elle existe avec la mise sur pied de nos « équipes de base ». Lors d’une récente réunion à Chapleau avec les équipes de planification pour la forêt Martel, un des conférenciers était M. Doug Pitt, Ph. D du Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois qui s’est entretenu des bienfaits des coupes d’éclaircie commerciales. La forêt Martel ressemble à plusieurs autres forêts ontariennes et même canadiennes où la récolte de premier passage se terminera dans les prochaines 10 ou 20 années. De plus, comme bien des forêts, la forêt Martel est confrontée à une baisse de son approvisionnement en bois dans les prochaines 20 années alors qu’on planifie la récolte de la forêt primaire originale restante, pendant que la seconde forêt primaire émergente n’est pas encore prête à être récoltée.Al Thorne

Depuis le début des années 1970, les efforts de reforestation ont été très productifs pour les forêts gérées en Ontario avec plusieurs excellents peuplements âgés de 25 à 40 ans. Puisque très peu de terres de la Couronne sont activement gérées de façon « postlibre de croissance », plusieurs de ces peuplements sont maintenant stockés en surabondance et ne grandissent pas à leur plein potentiel. La recherche scientifique reliée au mérite des coupes d’éclaircie commerciales est bien connue alors qu’une partie du peuplement est retirée de façon sélective afin d’optimiser les conditions de croissance pour les arbres restants permettant à ceux-ci de croître plus haut et plus rapidement. Par conséquent, ceci semble être une solution toute indiquée afin de commencer à s’attaquer à la pénurie en approvisionnement de bois prévue pour les 20 ou 30 années à venir.

Alors pourquoi ne faisons-nous pas plus de coupes d’éclaircie?
Je crois que le problème n’est pas la recherche scientifique, mais bien les politiques; et peut-être l’utilisation du mot « commercial ». Les gestionnaires forestiers sont tenus de regénérer les secteurs récoltés à leur état de libre croissance, c’est-à-dire à approximativement de 6’ à 10’ de hauteur et libre de concurrence menaçante, dans le cadre de leur mode de faire-valoir. Il s’agit essentiellement du prix à payer pour faire des affaires. De plus, plusieurs secteurs possèdent des fonds émergents comme le Fonds de réserve forestier de l’Ontario qui fournissent l’argent nécessaire à la régénération des secteurs touchés par le feu, les insectes, les maladies ou qui s’occupent de toute autre question reliée à la santé des forêts. Ces programmes sont essentiellement financés à 100 p. cent par le Fonds de réserve forestier. Les coupes d’éclaircie commerciales se classent séparément de ces cas, dans une sorte de « terrain sylvicole neutre. » Bien qu’il soit vrai qu’il existe un certain mérite aux matériaux surtout pulpeux ou de qualité de biomasse récoltée à l’aide d’une coupe d’éclaircie commerciale, la valeur engrangée à partir de cette matière ne couvre pas les coûts – même si les redevances d’exploitation par volume étaient de zéro dollar! Cette situation a tendance à être vraie autant lorsque le marché est bon que lorsqu’il est mauvais.gens.

Afin de s’attaquer à cette situation, j’aimerais proposer la création d’un fonds public – privé quelconque où la valeur de la coupe d’éclaircie effectuée aujourd’hui serait appliquée directement aux coûts supplémentaires nécessaires pour procéder au traitement de demain. Par exemple, si les coupes d’éclaircie valent 25 $ la tonne produite alors que leur production coûte 40 $, le montant supplémentaire requis du système public ne serait que de 15 $ la tonne afin d’assumer la différence. En fin de compte, tout le monde y gagnerait. Ceci pourrait s’avérer une de nos formes de sylviculture les moins dispendieuses avec un des retours sur l’investissement les plus importants. Nous avons beaucoup de progrès à réaliser en traitant la pénurie prévue de l’approvisionnement en bois. Nous créerons ainsi des emplois dont nous avons désespérément besoin à court terme et aiderons à soutenir la bioéconomie émergente. Afin de lancer cette idée, la première chose à faire est de changer le nom de coupe d’éclaircie « commerciale » et, de cette façon, d’éliminer l’idée fausse que cette pratique est aujourd’hui rentable.

Alan Thorne
Gérant général
Partenariat pour la recherche forestière

Haut de la page


Les dernières nouvelles...


La rencontre de l’équipe de base du Nord-Est se concentre sur la gestion de la densité et la coupe d’éclaircie


Le 1er octobre, l’équipe de base supérieure du PRF s’est rencontrée à Chapleau pour se concentrer sur les coupes d’éclaircie commerciales des forêts boréales. La rencontre a donné lieu à des présentations de Ken Lennon de la section Sciences et Information du Nord-est (SINE) du ministère des Richesses naturelles (MRN) de l’Ontario, de Peter Newton et de Doug Pitt du Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois et de Denis Gagnon de la Section de planification régionale du Nord-Est du MRN de même qu’à une visite sur le terrain pour voir les essais de coupes d’éclaircie dans le canton de Mageau au nord de Chapleau. La rencontre s’est bien déroulée et a attiré plusieurs participants. Elle a permis de clarifier et de souligner les outils scientifiques disponibles reliés à la gestion de la densité des peuplements et de faire la promotion de l’utilisation des coupes d’éclaircie commerciales et précommerciales à titre d’options sylvicoles viables dans les forêts boréales.


Cliquez ici afin de voir quelques photos de la session.
Cliquez ici afin d’avoir accès aux présentations.

Haut de la page


La série de cyberconférences du PRF est un succès


La série de cyberconférences de l’Institut forestier du Canada mettant en vedette le Partenariat pour la recherche forestière (septembre-octobre) s’est avérée un immense succès avec la participation moyenne de 60 à 70 sites. L’analyse révèle une participation de quatre ou cinq personnes par site. Trois sites ont aussi tiré profit de l’offre d’une aide financière pour « un dîner et une conférence » dans les sections régionales de l’Institut en Ontario.
La série incluait une variété de projets de recherche du PRF ainsi que leur rendement et a été très favorablement accueillie. Les présentations PowerPoint et les comptes rendus des conférences peuvent être téléchargés gratuitement sur le site du PRF. Ceux qui n’ont pu assister en direct à la conférence sont invités à en prendre connaissance.


Cliquez ici afin d’obtenir une affiche de ce qui a été présenté.

Cliquez ici afin d’avoir accès aux fichiers PDF de la présentation et aux fichiers WAV mettant en vedette le conférencier.

Haut de la page


La tournée des professeurs


La tournée forestière annuelle des professeurs basée au Centre écologique du Canada a une fois de plus connu un vif succès. Le PRF s’est impliqué en aidant à organiser l’événement qui incluait une visite du site de recherche sur le chêne rouge de la Section des sciences et de l'information du Sud du MRN et une excursion dans la forêt de recherche de Petawawa où plusieurs visites guidées des installations de recherche ont eu lieu. Matt Meade  a gracieusement présenté la conférence d’introduction appelée Foresterie 101.


Cliquez ici afin de voir un montage des photos de la tournée des professeurs.

Haut de la page


Visite de peupliers hybrides et d'épinette de Norvège


 Le PRF a organisé une visite guidée spéciale sur la biomasse le 25 septembre, dans le Nord de l'Ontario, coïncidant avec le Championnat international de labourage à New Liskeard.
Les visites sur le terrain inclurent plusieurs essais de plantations de peuplier hybride et d'épinette de Norvège sur des terres privées. Il y a beaucoup d'intérêt pour ces espèces à croissance rapide à l'égard du potentiel de boisement sur les terres agricoles abandonnées.

Cliquez ici pour quelques photos de l'événement.

Haut de la page


La journée scientifique de la Forest Ecosystem Science Cooperative


Le 30 septembre, la Forest Ecosystem Science Cooperative a organisé sa journée scientifique annuelle à Sault Ste. Marie. La coopérative forestière continue de coordonner et de veiller à de nombreux projets de recherche scientifique incluant plusieurs projets directement liés aux projets du PRF. Le PRF s’affairera à promouvoir une collaboration et une coopération ininterrompues avec la coopérative forestière pour la mise en pratique de la science et de la recherche qui améliorent les stratégies de forêt durable.


Cliquez ici afin de voir un montage des photos de l’événement.
Cliquez ici afin de visiter le site web de la Forest Ecosystem Science Cooperative (en anglais).

Haut de la page


Rencontre de planification de partage du savoir au Centre écologique du Canada (CEC)

Une rencontre de planification de partage du savoir a eu lieu le 16 septembre dernier au CEC avec la participation du PRF, du Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois, de FPInnovations et du MRN. Les discussions ont porté sur le plan d’extension du PRF en ce qui a trait à l’entente de partage du savoir en place avec FPInnovations et le financement du Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois. Des conseils ont été fournis sur la façon d’aligner les vastes activités du PRF avec les priorités stratégiques du Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois et FPInnovations afin d’optimiser la chaîne de valeur de la fibre de bois.


Cliquez ici afin d’obtenir une photo de la rencontre.

Haut de la page


La tournée de l’APFC et l’équipe de tournage

Le 15 septembre, une équipe de tournage coordonnée par l’APFC a visité le Centre écologique du Canada et plusieurs centres de recherche du PRF dans la forêt de Nipissing et aux alentours de celle-ci. Le groupe était aussi constitué des représentants de plusieurs acheteurs de pâtes à papier faisant enquête sur la durabilité de l’environnement des pratiques forestières au Canada. Chris McDonell de Tembec a organisé cet événement avec Al Stinson, Sue Pickering, John Pineau et John McNutt qui l’ont aidé pour la visite guidée.


Cliquez ici afin de voir quelques photos du groupe et de la visite.

Haut de la page


Le Sentier de recherche en foresterie

La planification de la restauration, de l’entretien et de la réinterprétation du Sentier de recherche en foresterie dans le parc provincial Samuel de Champlain près du CEC va bon train. Le sentier, qui a accueilli des dizaines de milliers de visiteurs depuis sa création il y a presque 10 ans, en a initié plus d’un à la science associée aux placettes d’échantillonnage permanentes, à la croissance et à la production. L’information sur les espèces d’arbres et les processus d’écosystème forestier se sont aussi avérés des thèmes d’interprétation importants. Le sentier avait été endommagé, résultat des intempéries et de l’usure normale.


De nouveaux panneaux d’interprétation seront préparés et installés cet automne. Pour plus de détails, veuillez communiquer avec : mbelanger@canadianecology.ca

Haut de la page


Le PRF à Nanaimo


Le partenariat était bien représenté à l’assemblée générale annuelle de l’IFC-CIF et à la conférence à Nanaimo, Colombie-Britannique pendant la semaine du 21 septembre. Matt Meade et Mat Belanger étaient tous deux présents pour s’occuper du kiosque du PRF et pour rencontrer les délégués provenant des quatre coins du Canada.

Haut de la page


Le point de vue d’un stagiaire sur les visites aux sites de recherche du bouleau jaune et du chêne rouge

Ci-dessous, vous trouverez les réflexions et les impressions de notre stagiaire en intégration de la science et information forestière – Mat Belanger :


Le 8 juillet, l’équipe d’extension du PRF s’est réunie au CEC et a par la suite effectué des visites aux sites de recherche du bouleau jaune et du chêne rouge des cantons de Phelps et d’Olrig. Le site des essais de dégagement des arbres de récolte du bouleau jaune et l’étude reliée des coupes d’éclaircie ont été créés il y a sept ans. Ce site demeure un endroit régulièrement fréquenté des scientifiques en foresterie, des praticiens et même du grand public. Il permet d’étudier les effets du couvert vertical au sol et de la distance de dégagement sur la régénération du bouleau jaune. Le site de recherche du chêne rouge où l’on croyait à l’origine avoir une prédominance d’érables rouges a été créé il y a six ans lorsqu’on a confirmé que le site avait en fait une forte population de chênes rouges. La science forestière n’a pas à l’heure actuelle la compréhension et le savoir liés à la régénération optimale du chêne rouge. Le chêne rouge s’avère d’une grande importance pour les espèces sauvages comme l’ours et le cerf. Nos connaissances actuelles indiquent que le chêne a besoin de feu et que les soins sylvicoles manuels sont meilleurs lorsqu’il y a moins de lumière. Les glands sont tout aussi efficaces que les semis d’arbre à des fins de régénération. Les résultats de ces études sont toujours en train d’être analysés, mais ils fourniront sans aucun doute une compréhension claire et approfondie de la régénération optimale du chêne rouge.

Haut de la page


Mise à jour du téléchargement des diagrammes de la gestion de la densité des peuplements

Cliquez ici afin de télécharger la plus récente version des diagrammes de la gestion de la densité des peuplements (en anglais).

Haut de la page


Les effets de la densité des peuplements sur la décroissance

Cliquez ici (PDF sur le site? – projet 130-702) afin d’obtenir le récent rapport publié sur les effets de la densité des peuplements sur la décroissance.

Haut de la page


La conférence sur l’exploitation de la biomasse à l’université de Nipissing

Le PRF a travaillé en collaboration avec l’université de Nipissing et de nombreux partenaires afin de planifier et d’organiser la conférence sur l’exploitation de la biomasse les 22 et 23 octobre à North Bay. La conférence se voulait un événement pratique faisant la promotion de l’utilisation de la biomasse comme énergie. Plus de 450 participants y ont assisté.


Cliquez ici pour de plus amples détails.
Cliquez ici (biomass conference and field tour – photos.pdf ) afin de voir quelques photos de la session.

Haut de la page


Événements à venir

Colloques scientifiques du PRF planifiés à Petawawa et à Timmins

L’équipe d‘extension du PRF planifie actuellement deux colloques scientifiques pour cet automne. Le premier est de façon provisoire prévu à Timmins à la mi-novembre et sera centré sur le caribou. Le deuxième, prévu à la forêt de recherche de Petawawa à la mi-décembre, se penchera sur l’utilisation de Patchworks à la forêt de recherche de Petawawa  et son intégration possible avec le modèle d’interface de FPInnovations.
À suivre pour plus de détails!

Haut de la page


 

Que pensez-vous de notre cyberbulletin?

Veuillez prendre quelques minutes pour nous présenter vos commentaires en  faisant parvenir un courriel à forest@canadianecology.ca

Veuillez acheminer ce cyberbulletin à vos collègues! Si vous désirez vous abonner ou annuler votre abonnement à ce cyberbulletin, veuillez envoyer un courriel à forest@canadianecology.ca

Pour consulter notre politique de confidentialité, visitez notre site Web à www.forestresearch.ca et cliquez sur « Politique de confidentialité » au haut de la page.

 

Haut de la page