header

If you are having trouble viewing this, click here

Forestry Research Partnership

July 2012 E-Newsletter

Spring was a busy time for the Forestry Research Partnership! Several forest science seminars, workshops, and field tours were held across the province including events in London, Sault Ste. Marie, Huntsville, Petawawa, Temagami, Chapleau and Mattawa.  The topics covered proved to be just as diverse as the locations in which they were held, and included an update on biomass studies, forest birds, mechanized logging, tree marking protocols and much more.

FRP logo

Le printemps s’est révélé une période bien remplie pour les membres du Partenariat pour la recherche forestière! Plusieurs conférences, ateliers et visites du secteur des sciences forestières ont été organisés un peu partout en province, notamment à London, à Sault Ste. Marie, à Huntsville, à Petawawa, à Temagami, à Chapleau et à Mattawa. Et la diversité des sites n’a eu d’égal que la variété des sujets abordés, qu’il s’agisse de l’étude de la biomasse, des oiseaux forestiers, de l’exploitation forestière mécanisée, des protocoles de marquage des arbres et plusieurs autres.

Contents

1) General Manager's Message

2) Comings and Goings

Looking Back:

3) FRP Interns Help With NEBIE Tree Planting

4) Careful Logging Workshop

5) Forest Birds Workshop

6) Simcoe County 100th Anniversary

7) Salamander Surveys at the Britt White Pine Shelterwood Study

8) Lions Club Youth Tree Plant

9) Boreal Forest Science Seminar

10) Biolley Hardwood Model Meeting

11) Multi-Provincial Boreal Mixed Woods 2012 Conference

12) ELC of Ontario Training Course

13) National E-Lecture Series Update

14) MNR Most Valuable Resource Award Winner

Coming Up:

15) Special E-Lecture Series: Forests Without Borders

16) Annual Teachers' Forestry Tour

17) Terrestrial Invasive Plant Species Conference

New Resources:

18) Past OFRI seminars available online

19) New Tree Tips added to the FRP Website

20) Ecological Land Classification of Ontario - new resources page online

Contenus du présent numéro

1) Message du Directeur général

2) Arrivées et départs

En rétrospective:

3) Les stagiaires du PRF participent aux essais du NEBIE

4) Coupe avec protection de la régénération

5) Atelier sur les oiseaux forestiers

6) Comté de Simcoe – 100e anniversaire

7) Enquête sur les salamandres dans le cadre de l’étude sur les coupes progressives de pins blancs de Britt

8) Club Lion : plantation d'arbres par les jeunes

9) Conférence scientifique sur la forêt boréale

10) Réunion au sujet du modèle Biolley appliqué au bois de feuillus

11) Conférence interprovinciale 2012 sur les forêts boréales mixtes

12) Formation sur le système ontarien de classification écologique des terres

13) Mise à jour concernant la série de conférences en ligne

14) Gagnant du prix de la ressource la plus précieuse du MRN

À venir :

15) Présentation no 8 de la série spéciale de conférences en ligne : « Forêts sans frontières »

16) Tournée annuelle des enseignants en foresterie

17) Conférence sur les espèces végétales terrestres envahissantes 

Nouvelles ressources:

18) Anciennes présentations de l’IRFO disponibles en ligne

19) De nouveaux conseils forestiers sur le site Web du PRF

20) Classification écologique des terres en Ontario : une page de ressources maintenant en ligne

1) General Manager's Message

Appreciation for the Doers

As tree planting season is now in full swing, and having also had the good fortune to recently tour a local sawmill built and run by a family business, I am once again reminded, and also firmly believe that we need to express our sincere thanks to those in the forest sector who make real - all of our latest science!

All the good work that is being done through a variety of FRP science and research projects has been well documented, as have the excellent efforts that continue with our extension and communication. However, I believe we do not give enough credit to those people who actually take all of our science and research results and outputs, our policies, rules and regulations - and make them real on the ground; and at the same time are hoping and trying to make a decent return on their hard work and investment at the end of the day.

It has also been well documented that the economic circumstances of the past six years or so have been very challenging, yet many businesses, both large and small, found ways to survive. Some are now even starting to look to grow again, as signs of improvement in the economy are starting to show. However, inside all of these businesses are the true heroes - the actual production workers who work in the rain, the heat, the cold, on day shift or night shift. They grow and plant trees, carry out site preparation, harvest trees, drive logging trucks, work in saw mills, pulp mills and other manufacturing facilities. As evidenced by the recent fires in northeastern Ontario, many of these folks fly aircraft to fight the fires, run heavy equipment to build fire guards, and work with hand tools and fire hoses to fight these fires.

When you get to meet these people over the years, some common themes emerge. The vast majority work in the forest sector because it is in their blood and they sincerely enjoy being in the forest. They are also very concerned about the health of the environment, and the well being and stability of their communities.

Based on all this, I believe we should express a heartfelt thank you to all of the people who actually make forest management and practice real on the ground, and who produce the forest products that the world demands. Without these individuals, none of our science and research would ever be made real, and none of our planning would come to successful fruition.

Sincerely,

Alan Thorne

General Manager

Forestry Research Partnership

al thorne general manager

Return to top

2) Comings and Goings

The CIF and FRP said goodbye to Laura Pickering recently. Laura was involved with a number of activities and projects during her time at the Canadian Ecology Centre. As the CIF Historian/Archivist, Laura organized historical documents for both the CIF and the Canadian Forestry Association (CFA). She was instrumental in maintaining the CFA website and developing and distributing CFA forestry teaching kits to schools across the country. Her devotion to the Old Growth section of The Forestry Chronicle was outstanding and we thank her for reviving and maintaining this important component of the journal.

Laura contributed to the organization of annual events including the CIF national conference and the Forestry Teachers’ Tour, specifically leading the development of special educational programs for students during these events. Being a qualified teacher, Laura was involved in outdoor educational programs focusing on forestry and environmental sustainability at the CEC throughout her internship. Laura will be back at the Canadian Ecology Centre this summer teaching a Grade 10 science credit course. After enjoying wedding festivities in August, Laura will be returning to Nipissing University where she will commence her Masters of History. We wish Laura all the best as she works to complete her masters program!

laura

The FRP and CIF welcome three new staff members this summer!

Loni Pierce recently moved to Mattawa from the west coast of BC to participate in a 12 month internship with the CIF and FRP. She is a graduate of Vancouver Island University as a Forest Resources Technologist, and has begun working towards her Bachelor of Science in Forestry. Prior to working for the CIF, Loni held a position on the Vancouver Island section council.

Loni first became interested in forestry while travelling around Australia, and hopes to one day return there to view their cloud forests more extensively. In the meantime she is very excited to be based at the CEC and to learn all that she can about Ontario forestry.  She is particularly interested in communications and administration, and the flow of information. Strongly believing that each individual can make a positive difference, if they have the knowledge to do so, Loni hopes to influence policies and programs to support this concept.

loni

Rebecca Ransome is also on a summer internship at the Canadian Ecology Centre, working with the CIF, FRP and MNR. She graduated with a BA in Forest Conservation last year and is now working towards her Masters of Forest Conservation at the University of Toronto. She previously worked at U of T's department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology in the endangered species lab, and did volunteer work for the Toronto Region Conservation Authority. She is particularly interested in forest ecology, invasive species management, species at risk, and fire ecology and is looking forward to being involved in various projects this summer.

rebecca

Finally, the CIF and FRP welcome Dan Marina back on board as Extension Project Coordinator.  Dan was with us for a short time last summer as a component of his Masters of Forest Conservation degree at the University of Toronto, which he successfully completed in December, 2011.  Dan will be based at the Canadian Ecology Centre in Mattawa for the extent of his internship. He has a Bachelor of Environmental Studies with honours in geography, a specialization in biophysical systems, and a minor in history from the University of Waterloo. He has also obtained a post-graduate certificate in ecosystem restoration from Niagara College Canada.

dan

Return to top

3) FRP Interns Help With NEBIE Tree Planting

Petawawa, ON – May 1-4

During the first week of May, Vanessa Chaimbrone and Loni Pierce, FRP interns, travelled to the Petawawa Research Forest (PRF) to assist with the NEBIE (Natural disturbance, Extensive, Basic, Intensive, Elite) Plot Network. This network was initiated in 2001 with the aim of comparing natural disturbances with a full range of extensive to elite silvicultural practices. Led by Wayne Bell of OFRI, the plot network now includes seven sites within the boreal and Great Lakes-St Lawrence Forest Regions.

Vanessa and Loni assisted Wayne and John Winters with planting of 2,700 white pine seedlings at the PRF NEBIE site. The planting of these seedlings marked the end of the establishment phase of the project. All roads, harvesting, site preparation, tree planting, and release programs have been completed for 120 two-hectare plots. These plots are now available for the research community to monitor the longer- term effects of intensification of silviculture on fibre production, species and genetic diversity, nutrient cycling, wildlife habitat, and forest ecosystems. They are also available for field tours to educate forest professionals, as well as members of the general public.

For more information about the NEBIE Plot Network click here

Return to top

4) Careful Logging: a Cooperative Workshop on the use of Mechanized Logging in Selection Harvesting

Huntsville, ON- May 8, 2012

On May 8th, Westwind Forest Stewardship Inc., along with the FRP and the CIF, hosted twenty members of the local forestry community to discuss the progress of mechanized logging in southern Ontario forests.  In a workshop entitled: “Careful Logging: a Cooperative Workshop on the use of Mechanized Logging in Selection Harvesting”, local forestry supervisors, managers, technicians, treemarkers and feller-buncher operators were brought together to discuss and find solutions for the issues faced by mechanized logging crews.  The day began with presentations by members of the hosting SFL and regional MNR specialists.  Trends in the application of mechanized logging, including efficiency grading and damage rates, growth potential studies and best management practices were discussed prior to heading out to three field locations where the open forum began.  Everyone present participated fully in the discussions, with numerous concerns, solutions and propositions for change outlined.

The workshop produced much positive and enlightening feedback which was used to construct a Practitioners Corner article featured in the July/August issue of The Forestry Chronicle.

Return to top

5) Forest Birds Workshop

Petawawa, ON - May 10

May 10th proved to be a great day for a walk in the woods.  Despite a cool wind, the song birds were plentiful and rather vocal, making for a successful bird watching/identification field exercise that started off the day-long workshop held at the Petawawa Research Forest (PRF).  The FRP and the CIF joined forces with both the PRF and the OMNR to host this forest birds workshop, which was focused on the needs and interests of landowners and land managers. Designed to present the latest regulations as well as the techniques for conserving forest birds in managed woodlands, the day included various speakers covering provincial guidelines and regulations, and identification tips and conservation techniques used throughout Ontario.  Highlights of the day included a morning and an afternoon field excursion where delegates identified common forest birds by both sight and song, along with identification of some common raptor stick nests found in the PRF.  One participant even managed to have a successful salamander “hunt”, catching (and releasing) numerous red backed salamanders in the Forest.

bird workshop

Al Stinson and Fred Pinto (OMNR-SSI) identify birds at the PRF.

A lunch-time charity BBQ for Forests without Borders was held and over $275 was raised through the generosity of the day’s 40 participants.  Hailed as a great success, talks of making the bird workshop an annual event are already under way.  Thank you again to all who attended and a special thank you to the PRF and presenters and organizers!  What a great way to spend a spring day in the woods.

For more information on the PRF contact:

Peter Arbour, Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or

Katalijn MacAfee, Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Return to top

6) Simcoe County 100th Anniversary

Midhurst, ON - May 11

Rooted in the Past, Growing for the Future

Simcoe County Forests celebrated its 90th anniversary on Friday May 11th at a special event held at Simcoe County Museum in Midhurst, Ontario. The sizable crowd listened intently to the afternoon’s presentations; including, a keynote address by Ken Armson, Chair of Ontario’s Forest History Society, as well as a special screening of the Simcoe County Forests 90th anniversary video, a historical account of the Simcoe County Forests from 1922 to present day. The FRP/CIF Forestry Extension Manager, Matt Meade, was present along with many resource managers, forestry professionals, former staff, historians, as well as interested members of the public.

Click here to check out the Simcoe County Forests 90th Anniversary video.

Click here to check out the media release from the event.


Return to top

7) Salamander Surveys at the Britt White Pine Shelterwood Study

Britt, ON – May-July

It’s that time of year again for surveying salamanders at the Britt white pine study. This study provides a unique opportunity to continue monitoring the response of the residual overstory, planted and natural white pine regeneration, forest floor disturbance, downed woody debris, and red-back salamander abundance in the uniform shelterwood system. Monitoring salamander abundance began in spring 1995 and has continued annually. The objective of this component of the study is to assess and compare the effect of harvesting followed by 4 site preparation treatments on the relative abundance of red-backed salamanders in white pine stands in central Ontario. Under Ontario's Crown Forest Sustainability Act, Eastern red-backed salamanders have been identified as one species that should be monitored as part of evaluating the sustainability of forest management practices.

Picture 139

Completing the surveys this season was done in collaboration with FRP/CIF Interns, Summer Experience Program students and the Parry Sound District SAR biologist, under the leadership of Andree Morneault and Dianne Othmer of the OMNR Southern Science and Information Branch. Thanks to all involved for your help this summer!

For more information on the Britt White Pine Study click here.

Return to top

8) Lions Club Youth Tree Plant

Temagami, ON – May 11

Joining forces with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), and the Mattawa and Temagami Lions Clubs, the FRP/CIF helped local students plant a mix of white pine and jack pine in an area that was disturbed by a forest fire in 1999. The fire spread though the southern limits of Temagami along Highway 11. The Municipality of Temagami, forest industry, and the OMNR decided cooperatively to leave this accessible area to regenerate naturally; thus opening up opportunities for research and education. As part of an ongoing study, OMNR Southern Science and Information technicians established long term sample plots, vegetation plots, downed woody debris transects, and salamander boards on the burned site. These plots are used to measure forest growth, productivity, and changes in plant communities over time.

In May, the Lions Club members and two local schools (Temagami Public School and Bear Island Laura McKenzie Learning Centre) promoted a “Go Green” campaign and also partnered with the Green Side Up Project created by Mattawa Lions Club member Wayne Reid, also Forest Science Technician with Southern Science and Information, OMNR. The FRP/CIF was pleased to be part of this event, which provided a wonderful experiential learning opportunity for the students involved.

tree planting

For more information on the project please contact:

Andree Morneault, Southern Science and Information, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Return to top

9) Boreal Forest Science Seminar

Chapleau, ON – May 15

Despite high winds, hungry black flies and encroaching wild fires, 25 members of OMNR, CFS, Tembec, CIF and FRP joined together in Chapleau for a “travelling roadshow” of northern science in early May.  The day-long field tour began in the morning at the Island Lake Biomass Research and Demonstration Site where Dave Morris of CNFER, and Paul Hazlett of the CFS spoke to the group about a variety of site treatments being implemented, as well as covering some of the biodiversity and soils research being conducted. Next the group moved on to the Island Lake tree nursery where the group was treated to a delicious field lunch prior to a presentation by Randy Ford of NESMA (Northeast Seed Management Association), focusing on some of the ongoing tree improvement efforts at the site.  The day’s third field location brought the group to a sunny creek side where CFS Aquatic Eco-toxicology Technician Kevin Good spoke about the on-going forest stream health bio-indicator research throughout the Northern region.  Finally the group moved to a second-generation tree improvement site with Vic Wearn, to conclude the discussion.

pitfall

Lisa Venier (CFS Biodiversity Scientist) demonstrates how pitfall traps are used.

The day proved to be a great success, with the casual atmosphere allowing for open discussion and commentary.  Back at the Chapleau OMNR office, a BBQ dinner awaited all, and busy fire crews had graciously lent the group their oversized BBQ for a Forests without Borders fund-raising dinner.  This potluck style BBQ allowed CIF Executive Director John Pineau the opportunity to show off his culinary skills yet again in the preparation of the burgers and sausages (we won’t mention that they were pre-cooked).  The lively and fun-filled social event raised almost $170 for Forests without Borders.  Thank you again to all the presenters and to those who attended. As was stated: “A bad day in the bush still beats a good day in the office!” But it was a good day in the field nonetheless.


Return to top

10) Biolley Hardwood Model Meeting

Mattawa, ON – May 23-24

Members of the Ontario Tree Marking Committee gathered on May 23-24th at the Canadian Ecology Centre to review the Biolley Hardwood Model;  a decision-support system designed by the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre (CWFC) - Natural Resources Canada. The model intends to help silviculturists and forest managers to optimize the selection of trees to harvest in hardwood stands managed with the selection system. Jean-Martin Lussier from the CWFC presented the model to the group and outlined its functions. The group reviewed the model’s output using tree list and stand data from the Parkside Gully Study Site in Algonquin Park. This is the longest single tree selection study in Canada, and has undergone four successive cutting cycles. In comparison to the Ontario tree marking guidelines, the Biolley model, without any constraints applied, suggested harvesting higher quality trees and retaining lower quality trees. Another major difference was the treatment of polewood; under the Ontario tree marking guide, low quality poles would be removed, whereas the Biolley model suggests that all poles be retained. The group then visited the Daventry Road single tree selection site to compare how each system would look in the stand.

The committee suggested three main areas for improvements to the Biolley model: economic improvements, site class consideration, and implementation of sustainability requirements. It was concluded that there is potential to use of the Biolley model in Ontario, to help incorporate economic considerations into tree marking, which the current system does not allow. Forest managers in Ontario could also use the Biolley model to achieve an ideal stand structure over multiple harvests.

For more information on the Biolley Hardwood Model please contact:

Jean-Martin Lussier, Canadian Wood Fibre Centre

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Return to top

11)  Multi- Province Boreal Mixed Woods  Conference

 Edmonton, Alberta – June 17-20

From June 17th to 20th, Edmonton Alberta was host to Boreal Mixed Woods - Ecology and Management for Multiple Values, a conference that attracted more than 120 delegates from across Canada. The event provided an excellent forum for the presentation and discussion of current knowledge relating to the ecology and management of mixed wood stands and landscapes to achieve ecological, social and economic objectives; this also included evolving opportunities to improve the value of products being produced from these forests. The conference was hosted by the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre- Natural Resources Canada and the University of Alberta, and was sponsored by many organizations including the Canadian Institute of Forestry Rocky Mountain Section as well as the Institute’s Forest Ecology Working group. The program included invited keynote speakers, volunteer papers, discussion sessions, and a volunteer poster session.

Mixed wood forests are an ecologically and economically prominent and important component of Canada’s boreal forest. A wealth of knowledge relating to the ecology and management of boreal mixed wood forests has been developed over the past 20 years, by researchers and forest managers. Outcomes of the conference will include a national e-lecture series scheduled for late summer, and a boreal mixed wood theme issue of The Forestry Chronicle scheduled to be published in mid 2013.

For more information about the conference click here.

Return to top

12) ELC of Ontario Training Course

Mattawa, ON – June 26-29

District MNR staff, area foresters, planners, species at risk biologists, renewable energy staff, and wetland technicians gathered at the Canadian Ecology Centre for the Provincial Ecological Land Classification (ELC) training course in late June. This particular course was offered to MNR staff within central and eastern parts of Ontario as part of a series of training sessions which have been ongoing across the province in support of the program.

The course provided participants with an overview of the new Provincial ELC, including linkages to the new forest resource inventory in the Area of the Undertaking. The course emphasized the basic concepts and skills required for users and interpreters of the ELC.  The course included both in-class sessions and hands-on experience with respect to soils, vegetation, and ecosite classification. Topics covered during the four day course included core concepts, organization, products and use of the Provincial ELC; site and soil/substrates assessment; field keys for identification of ecosites; development of vegetation types; and applications to inventory, data collection and linkages to natural resource interpretations.

Mattawa 2012

For more information on ELC training sessions, contact:

Peter Uhlig, Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or

Monique Wester, Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Return to top

13) National E-lecture Series Update

Looking Back, Looking Forward: The Ongoing History of Canada’s Forests

Our current Forest on Your Desktop National Electronic Lecture Series is just wrapping up. The two month series featured presentations by our four forest history societies in Canada, historians, and other history buffs from across the country. If you missed any you can check them out on our website in the E-Lecture Archives.

Click here to view the poster and all the details.

Boreal Mixedwoods: Ecology and Management for Multiple Values

Mixedwood forests are an ecologically and economically prominent and important component of Canada’s boreal forests. Stay tuned for the CIF/IFC’s upcoming “Forest on Your Desktop” electronic lecture series, featuring presentations from The Boreal Mixedwoods 2012 conference in Edmonton, AB this spring. This series runs from August 8th to September 26th and will look at everything from “The Effects of partial cutting in aspen-dominated stands on the eastern edge of the boreal mixedwood” to “Modeling juvenile aspen-spruce growth dynamics”.

To register for some, one or all of these E-lectures please contact:

Dan Marina

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Return to top

14)  MNR Most Valuable Resource Award Winner

In late June, one of FRP’s dedicated volunteers and a long-time CIF member, Fred Pinto, Acting Coordinator of the Terrestrial Unit for Ministry of Natural Resources’ Southern Science and Information in North Bay was honoured with the distinction of receiving a ministry-wide MNR Most Valuable Resource Award in the category of Leadership.

Six awards are handed out on an annual basis in various categories including Leadership, and they help recognize and thank employees who have made an outstanding contribution in the workplace in support of the delivery of the ministry’s mandate and have demonstrated their commitment to excellence.  This year, Fred was recognized for inspiring others to achieve their full potential.  His vision, positive attitude, integrity, enthusiasm, and commitment to “do it right” encourages others to deliver high quality products and services that promote forest sustainability, a mandate that is critical to the ecological, social, and economic well-being of Ontarians.

fred

Fred has actively volunteered with the Canadian Institute of Forestry (CIF) for over 30 years. He has served on Section Councils as Chair and Director and as President of the Institute, ultimately serving a four year term on the national executive. Fred helped to modernize the Institute's communications activities in the form of new continuing education and professional development programs, including a national electronic lecture series focusing on all things forestry. Fred devotes a great deal of his time to teaching up-coming young forest professionals, helping them to develop a broad and balanced understanding of forestry. He has personally overseen University of Toronto annual forestry field camps based at the Canadian Ecology Centre, for 14 years and has taught forest related subjects at Nipissing University and Algonquin College. His local work with the Laurier Woods and the Nipissing Naturalists Club is also recognized by many as outstanding. In recognition for his volunteer activities, Fred was recently nominated for the United Nations Forest Heroes award.

Congratulations to Fred on his recent award and for always being a leader by example in his commitment to Ontario’s natural resource management.

Return to top

15)  Special E-lecture Series #8: Forests without Borders

The CIF’s next Special E-Lecture Series is entitled “Forests without Borders: Sharing Skills, Knowledge and Tools for Sustainable Community Development Beyond Borders”. This next series showcases the three projects being undertaken by the CIF’s charity – Forests without Borders. Tune in to hear all about our efforts in Zambia, Haiti and Nepal.

Click here to view the lecture series poster

To register for some, one or all of these E-lectures please contact:

Matt Meade

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Return to top

16) Annual Teachers' Forestry Tour

This year marks the 11th Annual Teachers’ Forestry Tour, presented by the Canadian Institute of Forestry at the Canadian Ecology Centre near Mattawa, Ontario. Each year, teachers from across the province attend the teachers’ tour and gain new knowledge and perspectives about the forest sector, and the practices used to manage forests sustainably.  The teachers are exposed to all aspects of modern forestry; from the research occurring in the field through a visit to the McConnell Lakes White Pine Competition Study, to the new and innovative products being derived from the forest by visiting Tembec’s mill in Temiscaming, Quebec. The teachers also learn about the years of planning and research that is required in writing a Forest Management Plan. Teachers are often surprised by the amount and rigor of the research occurring in the province, and by the passion of the professionals who are committed to finding the best ways to manage Ontario’s forests. Many of the teachers who attend are from south of Barrie, and have a perception of forestry that is heavily influenced by the media. The goal of the tour is to provide a balanced view of forestry in Ontario and ensure that they have the tools to teach that information in their own classrooms. Teachers leave with not only the information and experiences they gain throughout the week, but also with many teaching resources and contacts that they can use to continue the discussion about forestry when they get home.

We are looking forward to another great week with teachers from all over Ontario, so stay tuned for an update late summer or early fall 2012.

Click here to view the promotional poster.

Return to top

17) Terrestrial Invasive Plant Species Conference: Understanding Plan Invasions in a Changing World

Sault Ste. Marie, ON – August 20-22

The Invasive Species Research Institute (ISRI), along with Algoma University, OMNR, the Ontario Invasive Plant Council and the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters, are hosting the inaugural Terrestrial Invasive Plant Species conference in August 2012. The conference will focus on science findings relevant in Ontario and address contemporary issues in the field of terrestrial invasive plant and associated microbial species biology and ecology.

Click here for more information.

Return to top

18) Past OFRI seminars available online

Did you know most OFRI seminars are eligible for continuing education credits through the Ontario Professional Foresters Association and the Canadian Institute of Forestry?

Click here to listen!

Return to top

19) New Tree Tips

FRP Project 130-506: Red Oak Silvicultural Effectiveness

FRP Project 140-501: Marten as Indicators of IFM Effects

Return to top

 

20) Ecological Land Classification of Ontario – resources page now online

For the latest publications, factsheets, and reports on ELC in Ontario, click here


Return to top

frp_logo_bi


1) Message du Directeur général

Appréciation à l’égard des gens d’action

À l’heure où la saison de plantation bat son plein, et après avoir eu la chance de visiter récemment une scierie locale construite et administrée par une entreprise familiale, je constate une fois de plus (et j’en ai la conviction) qu’il importe d’exprimer nos plus sincères remerciements à ces gens du secteur forestier qui mettent en œuvre nos plus récentes avancées scientifiques!

Du reste, toutes les belles réalisations qui sont concrétisées par le biais des projets scientifiques et de recherche du PRF ont été bien documentés, tout comme nos activités de diffusion et de communication. Toutefois, je reste persuadé que nous n’accordons pas suffisamment de mérite à ces gens qui, sur le terrain, concrétisent véritablement tous nos résultats scientifiques et de recherche et donnent un sens à l’ensemble de nos politiques et règlements, et qui éprouvent de la satisfaction à l’égard du dur labeur et des investissements consentis.

Il apparaît clairement que la conjoncture économique a posé des obstacles redoutables au cours des quelque six dernières années, mais plusieurs entreprises, peu importe leur taille, ont néanmoins trouvé des moyens de résister, si bien que certaines d’entre elles envisagent désormais une nouvelle période de croissance alors que l’économie commence à montrer des signes de reprise. Cependant, c’est bel et bien au cœur de ces entreprises que se trouvent les véritables héros, c'est-à-dire les employés de la production qui travaillent sous la pluie, sous la chaleur, au froid et à raison de quarts de jour et de nuit. Ils plantent et cultivent des arbres, s’occupent de la préparation du site, veillent à l’abattage, manœuvrent les camions grumiers, ou encore assurent le fonctionnement des scieries, des usines de pâte et d’autres installations de fabrication. Comme on l’a vu récemment dans le cas des incendies dans le nord-est de l’Ontario, plusieurs de ces travailleurs pilotent des avions-citernes, utilisent des équipements lourds pour ériger des pare-feu ou manipulent des outils ou des tuyaux d’incendie pour y combattre le feu.

À force de côtoyer ces gens au fil des ans, on arrive à discerner certains thèmes récurrents. En effet, la plupart des travailleurs du secteur forestier s’y plaisent parce qu’ils ont ça dans le sang et qu’ils aiment véritablement se retrouver en forêt. Ce sont des gens qui sont très préoccupés par la santé de l’environnement ainsi que par le bien-être et la stabilité des collectivités qui y vivent.

Pour tous ces motifs, je crois qu’il est de notre devoir d’exprimer notre plus sincère gratitude à l’égard de ces gens qui veillent véritablement à la gestion forestière et à sa mise en pratique sur le terrain, et qui assurent la concrétisation des produits forestiers dont le monde a besoin. Sans eux, nos avancées dans le domaine de la science et de la recherche seraient vaines, et tous nos efforts de planification resteraient en plan.

Salutations,

Alan Thorne

Directeur général

Partenariat pour la recherche forestière

al thorne general manager

haute de la page

2) Arrivées et départs

L'IFC et le PRF saluent le départ de Laura Pickering. Au cours de son séjour au sein du Centre écologique du Canada (CEC), Laura a participé à de nombreux projets et activités. À titre d’historienne et d’archiviste de l’IFC, elle a veillé à l’organisation de divers documents historiques pour le compte de l’IFC et de l’Association forestière canadienne (AFC). Elle a joué un rôle central dans le maintien du site Web de l’AFC ainsi que dans la conception et la diffusion des trousses d’apprentissage forestier de l’AFC à l’intention des écoles de toutes les régions du pays. Elle a su faire preuve d’un dévouement hors pair relativement à la section « Forêts anciennes » de la publication The Forestry Chronicle, et nous tenons à la remercier d’avoir redonné vie à ce volet important de la revue.

Laura a contribué à l’organisation de diverses activités annuelles comme l’assemblée générale annuelle de l’IFC et la Tournée des enseignants en foresterie, dans le cadre de laquelle elle a notamment chapeauté l’élaboration des programmes spéciaux de formation à l’intention des étudiants. En sa qualité d’enseignante qualifiée, elle a largement pris part aux programmes de formation en extérieurs axés sur la foresterie et la durabilité environnementale au sein du CEC, et ce, tout au long de son stage. Laura reviendra au Centre écologique du Canada cet été pour y enseigner un cours à unité de dixième année en sciences. Après des célébrations nuptiales qui auront lieu en août, elle compte retourner à l’Université Nipissing pour y amorcer des études de maîtrise en histoire. Nous lui souhaitons tout le succès mérité au cours de son cheminement!

laura

Cet été, le PRF et l'IFC accueillent trois nouveaux membres du personnel!

En provenance de la côte ouest en Colombie-Britannique, Loni Pierce s'est récemment installée à Mattawa dans le but de faire un stage de 12 mois avec l’IFC et le PRF. Technologue en ressources forestières diplômée de l’Université de Vancouver Island, elle a amorcé des études dans le cadre du baccalauréat ès sciences en foresterie. Avant de se joindre à l’IFC, Loni a occupé un poste au sein du conseil (section de Vancouver Island), et se dit très heureuse de poursuivre au sein de l’organisme.

Loni s'est d’abord intéressée à la foresterie dans le cadre de périples en Australie, un pays où elle aimerait bien retourner un jour pour pouvoir apprécier davantage les forêts montagneuses humides qu’on y trouve. Entre-temps, elle se montre très enthousiaste à l’idée de s’installer au CEC et d’en apprendre le plus possible au sujet des divers aspects de la foresterie. Elle s’intéresse particulièrement aux communications, à l’administration et au flux de l’information. Persuadée que chacun est en mesure d’apporter une contribution positive s’il possède les connaissances nécessaires, Loni espère avoir l’occasion de teinter les politiques et les programmes en ce sens.

loni

Rebecca Ransome entreprend un stage en foresterie au sein du Centre écologique du Canada dans le cadre d’une collaboration avec l’IFC et le ministère des Richesses naturelles. Titulaire depuis l’an dernier d’un baccalauréat en conservation des forêts, elle étudie actuellement en vue de l’obtention d’une maîtrise en conservation des forêts à l’Université de Toronto. Elle a notamment déjà œuvré au sein du laboratoire pour les espèces menacées du département d’écologie et de biologie évolutionniste de l’Université de Toronto, et a agi à titre de bénévole pour l’Office de protection de la nature de Toronto et de la région. Elle s’intéresse notamment à l’écologie forestière, à la gestion des espèces envahissantes, aux espèces menacées et à l’écologie relative aux feux de forêt. Elle compte s’impliquer dans divers projets au cours de l’été.

rebecca

L'IFC et le PRF sont heureux de souligner le retour de Dan Marina à titre de coordonnateur du projet de diffusion. Dan a effectué un court séjour parmi nous l’été dernier dans le cadre de ses études de maîtrise en conservation des forêts à l’Université de Toronto, qui lui a décerné un diplôme en décembre 2011. Il travaillera à partir du Centre écologique du Canada de Mattawa pour la durée de son stage. Dan est titulaire d’un baccalauréat en études environnementales avec spécialisation en géographie, d’une spécialisation en systèmes biophysiques, et d’une mineure en histoire de l’Université de Waterloo. Il détient également un certificat de cycle supérieur en restauration des écosystèmes décerné par le Niagara College Canada.

dan


haute de la page

3) Les stagiaires du PRF participent aux essais du NEBIE

 Petawawa (Ontario) – 1er au 4 mai

Les stagiaires du PRF Vanessa Chaimbrone et Loni Pierce se sont rendues sur le site de la Forêt expérimentale de Petawawa pour prendre part aux activités associées au réseau parcellaire NEBIE (Natural disturbance, Extensive, Basic, Intensive, Elite). Ce réseau parcellaire a été inauguré en 2001 dans le but de comparer les perturbations naturelles par rapport à une gamme complète de pratiques de sylviculture élite et extensive. Chapeauté par Wayne Belle de l’IRFO, le réseau parcellaire regroupe désormais sept sites répartis dans les régions forestières des Grands Lacs et du Saint-Laurent.

Vanessa and Loni ont eu l’occasion d’épauler Wayne Bell et John Winters dans la plantation de 2700 plants de pins blancs sur le site de la Forêt expérimentale de Petawawa. Ces activités de plantation marquaient ainsi la fin de la phase de déploiement du projet. On a ainsi procédé à l’aménagement des routes, à l’abattage, à la préparation des sites, à la plantation des arbres et à la mise en œuvre des programmes de distribution pour des parcelles totalisant 120 hectares. Ces parcelles sont désormais à la disposition des chercheurs qui pourront y constater les effets à plus long terme de l’intensification de la sylviculture sur la production fibreuse, sur la diversité des espèces et des gènes, sur le cycle des substances nutritives, sur l’habitat faunique et sur les écosystèmes forestiers. Ces terrains serviront également à la formation de professionnels comme les exploitants forestiers, les biologistes ou les écologistes, et seront également ouverts au grand public.

Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements au sujet du réseau parcellaire NEBIE, cliquez ici.


haute de la page

4) Coupe avec protection de la régénération : un atelier coopératif sur l’utilisation de l’abattage mécanisé en contexte sélectif

Huntsville (Ontario) - 8 mai 2012

Le 8 mai dernier, de concert avec le PRF et l’IFC, Westwind Forest Stewardship a accueilli une vingtaine de membres de la communauté forestière locale pour échanger sur les avancées dans le domaine de l’abattage mécanisé dans les forêts du sud de l’Ontario. Dans le cadre d’un atelier ayant pour thème « Coupe avec protection de la régénération : un atelier coopératif sur l’utilisation de l’abattage mécanisé en contexte sélectif », les chercheurs se sont réunis avec des superviseurs forestiers, des gestionnaires, des techniciens, des marqueurs et des opérateurs d’abatteuse-empileuse pour se pencher sur les enjeux quotidiens auxquels sont confrontées les équipes d’abattage mécanisé. La journée s’est amorcée par quelques brèves présentations proposées par des membres de l’organisme hôte (SFL) et divers spécialistes locaux rattachés au ministère des Richesses naturelles. Après avoir abordé le sujet des tendances dans la mise en pratique des procédés d’abattage mécanisé (notamment les taux d’efficacité et d’avarie), ainsi que les études sur le potentiel de croissance et les pratiques de gestion exemplaires, les participants se sont rendus sur trois sites pour y tenir des discussions ouvertes. Tous les intervenants ont pleinement participé aux échanges en mettant de l’avant plusieurs préoccupations, d’éventuelles solutions et diverses propositions.

L’atelier a permis de tirer profit d’une rétroaction positive et enrichissante ayant servi de base à la rédaction d’un article dans la section « La rubrique des professionnels » du numéro de juillet-août de la revue The Forestry Chronicle.


haute de la page

5) Atelier sur les oiseaux forestiers

Petawawa (Ontario) - 10 mai

Le 10 mai dernier était une belle journée pour marcher dans les bois. Malgré le vent frais, les oiseaux chanteurs étaient nombreux et s’en donnaient à cœur joie, ce qui a contribué à faire une réussite de cette activité d’ornithologie pour amorcer cet atelier d’un jour au cœur de la Forêt expérimentale de Petawawa. Pour cette occasion, le PRF et l’IFC avaient uni leurs forces, de concert avec les responsables de la Forêt expérimentale et du ministère des Richesses naturelles de l’Ontario, pour organiser un atelier portant sur les oiseaux forestiers à l’intention des propriétaires et des administrateurs de terres. Structurées dans le but de présenter la plus récente réglementation et les techniques de pointe pour la préservation des oiseaux forestiers au sein des terres à bois gérées, les activités de la journée faisaient place à divers conférenciers abordant divers aspects liés à la réglementation et aux lignes directrices provinciales, et proposant divers conseils et techniques de préservation utilisées en Ontario. Une excursion matinale et une autre en après-midi constituaient les moments forts de la journée, alors que les délégués ont pu reconnaître des oiseaux forestiers communs, tant visuellement que par leur chant. Ils ont également eu l’occasion de constater la présence de nids de brindille construits par les oiseaux de proie communs dans la Forêt expérimentale de Petawawa. L’un des participants y a même réussi une « chasse » à la salamandre fructueuse, alors qu’il a pu attraper (et relâcher) plusieurs salamandres cendrées.

bird workshop

À l’heure du lunch, on a organisé un barbecue de bienfaisance au profit de l’organisme Forêts sans frontières. Grâce à la générosité des quelque 40 participants à cette journée, on a réussi à amasser la somme de 275 $ pour favoriser les initiatives actuelles de l’organisme. Compte tenu du succès remarquable de cette journée, on parle déjà d’en faire une activité annuelle dans un avenir rapproché. Nous tenons à remercier encore une fois tous les participants qui ont pris part à cette journée, notamment les conférenciers et les organisateurs! Quelle belle façon de passer une journée de printemps dans les bois…

Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements au sujet de la Forêt expérimentale de Petawawa, veuillez communiquer avec Peter Arbour ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) ou Katalijn MacAfee ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).

haute de la page

6) Comté de Simcoe – 100e anniversaire

Midhurt (Ontario) - 11 mai

Enraciné dans le passé, tourné vers l’avenir

Le vendredi 11 mai dernier, les Forêts du comté de Simcoe célébraient leur 90e anniversaire dans le cadre d’une activité spéciale organisée au Musée de comté de Simcoe, à Midhurst (Ontario). La foule importante qui s’y était réunie a écouté d’une oreille attentive les présentations d’après-midi, notamment l’allocution de Ken Armson, président de la Forest History Society de l’Ontario, avant de pouvoir visionner une présentation vidéo spéciale à l’occasion du 90e anniversaire des Forêts du comté de Simcoe, où l’on rappelait le parcours historique de l’organisme de 1922 à aujourd’hui. Le gestionnaire de la diffusion forestière du PRF et de l’IFC, Matt Meade, s’est joint au groupe de badauds composé de gestionnaires des ressources, de professionnels de la foresterie, d’historiens, d’anciens employés et d’autres personnes intéressées.

Veuillez cliquer ici pour visionner la vidéo commémorative à l’occasion du 90e anniversaire des Forêts du comté de Simcoe.

Veuillez cliquer ici pour consulter le communiqué de presse associé à cette activité.

 

haute de la page

7) Enquête sur les salamandres dans le cadre de l’étude sur les coupes progressives de pins blancs de Britt

Britt (Ontario) – mai à juillet

Voilà déjà revenu ce moment de l’année, soit celui de l’enquête sur les salamandres dans le cadre de l’étude sur les pins blancs de Britt. Il s’agit d’une étude offrant une occasion unique de surveiller la réponse de l’étage dominant résiduel, de la régénération forestière du pin blanc (par voie naturelle ou par reboisement), de la perturbation de la couverture morte, des débris ligneux gisants et de l’abondance de la salamandre cendrée en fonction du mode de régénération par coupes progressives uniformes. La surveillance de l’abondance de la salamandre a commencé au printemps de 1995 et se poursuit chaque année depuis cette époque. Ce volet de l’étude a pour but d’évaluer et de comparer les incidences sur l’abondance de la salamandre cendrée découlant de la méthode d’abattage complétée par quatre traitements de préparation du site dans les plantations de pins blancs des régions centrales de l’Ontario. En vertu de la Loi sur la durabilité des forêts de la Couronne de l’Ontario, la salamandre cendrée de l’Est a été ciblée comme l’une des espèces à surveiller dans le cadre de l’évaluation de la durabilité des pratiques de gestion forestière.

Picture 139

Cette fois-ci, l’enquête a été réalisée en collaboration avec les stagiaires du PRF et de l’IFC ainsi qu’avec les étudiants du Programme expérience été, sous la gouverne d’Andrée Morneault et de Dianne Othmer de la Section des sciences et de l’information du sud au sein du ministère des Richesses naturelles de l’Ontario. Merci à tous les collaborateurs pour votre aide cet été!

Pour de plus amples renseignements sur l’étude sur les pins blancs de Britt, cliquez ici.

 

haute de la page

8) Club Lion : plantation d'arbres par les jeunes

Temagami (Ontario) – 11 mai

De concert avec le ministère des Richesses naturelles de l’Ontario et les sections du Club Lion de Mattawa et de Temagami, le PRF et l’IFC ont aidé les étudiants à planter des pins blancs et des pins gris sur un territoire dévasté par un incendie de forêt en 1999, lequel s’était propagé jusqu’aux limites de Temagami au sud, le long de la route 11. Les représentants de la municipalité de Temagami ainsi que de l’industrie forestière et du ministère des Richesses naturelles de l’Ontario (MRNO) avaient décidé conjointement de favoriser la régénération naturelle au sein de cette zone accessible, ce qui s’avérait profitable à la recherche et à l’éducation. Dans le cadre d’une étude permanente, les techniciens de la Section des sciences et de l’information du sud au sein du MRNO ont délimité des zones d’échantillonnage à long terme, des parcelles de végétation, des transects de débris ligneux gisants ainsi que des planches à salamandre sur le territoire incendié. Ces zones d’échantillonnage à long terme servent ainsi à mesurer la croissance forestière et les changements dans les formations végétales au fil du temps.

tree planting

En mai, les membres du Club Lion et de deux écoles locales (Temagami Public School et Island Laura McKenzie Learning Centre) ont fait la promotion d’une campagne verte (« Go Green »), et se sont joints à l’initiative « Green Side Up » mise sur pied par les membres du Club Lion de Mattawa et par Wayne Reid, technicien en sciences forestières de la Section des sciences et de l’information du sud du MRNO. Le PRF et l’IFC étaient heureux d’avoir l’occasion de participer à cette activité grâce à laquelle les étudiants ont pu profiter d’une excellente occasion d’apprendre.

Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements au sujet de ce projet, veuillez communiquer avec :

Andrée Morneault, Section des sciences et de l’information du sud, ministère des Richesses naturelles de l’Ontario, à l’adresse This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  

haute de la page

9) Conférence scientifique sur la forêt boréale

Chapleau (Ontario) – 15 mai

Au début du mois de mai, malgré la présence de forts vents, de mouches noires voraces et de feux de friches envahissants, 25 représentants du MRNO, du Service canadien des forêts (SCF), de Tembec, de l’IFC et du PRF se sont réunis à Chapleau dans le cadre d’une « tournée itinérante » à saveur scientifique dans le nord. La journée sur le terrain s’est amorcée en matinée sur le site de démonstration et de recherche en biomasse d’Island Lake où les chercheurs Dave Morris du Centre de recherche sur l'écosystème des forêts du Nord et Paul Hazlett du Service canadien des forêts ont présenté aux participants divers traitements sur site ayant été mis en œuvre. Ils ont également abordé certains volets de la recherche actuelle sur les sols et la biodiversité. Par la suite, le groupe s’est dirigé vers la pépinière d’Island Lake où ils ont eu la chance de déguster un excellent repas à l’extérieur avant d’assister à la présentation de Randy For de la NESMA (Northeast Seed Management Association) au sujet de certaines mesures d’amélioration continue en milieu forestier. Les membres du groupe se sont ensuite dirigés vers un troisième site, soit sur les berges ensoleillées d’un ruisseau où Kevin Good, technicien en écotoxicologie aquatique au sein de l’IFC, les a entretenus à propos de projets de recherche actuels sur les indicateurs biologiques pour la santé des ruisseaux forestiers dans les régions du nord. Enfin, pour conclure l’activité, le groupe a visité un site d’amélioration des arbres de deuxième génération sous la direction de Vic Wearn.


La journée a été un franc succès alors que l’atmosphère conviviale a favorisé les échanges francs et la rétroaction. Une fois de retour au bureau de Chapleau du MRNO, la troupe s’est rassemblée autour d’un barbecue où les équipes de lutte contre les incendies avaient gracieusement prêté leurs grils surdimensionnés pour permettre la tenue d’un repas de bienfaisance au profit de l’organisme Forêts sans frontières. Dans le cadre de ce barbecue-partage, le directeur général de l’IFC, John Pineau, a eu l’occasion de montrer ses talents culinaires en préparant hamburgers et saucisses (gardons sous silence le fait qu’elle étaient précuites…) Cette activité animée et amusante a permis d’amasser tout près de 170 $ pour Forêts sans frontières. Merci encore à tous les conférenciers et aux participants. Et comme on l’a mentionné : « Mieux vaut une mauvaise journée dans les bois qu’une bonne journée au bureau! » Et la journée s’est révélée superbe au surplus.

haute de la page

10) Réunion au sujet du modèle Biolley appliqué au bois de feuillus

Mattawa (Ontario) – 23-24 mai

Les membres du Comité de marquage des arbres de l’Ontario se sont réunis les 23 et 24 mai au Centre écologique du Canada pour se pencher sur le modèle Biolley appliqué au bois de feuillus, c'est-à-dire un système de soutien au processus décisionnel conçu par le Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois (CCFB) de Ressources naturelles Canada. Le modèle vise à aider les sylviculteurs et les gestionnaires forestiers à optimiser la sélection des arbres à abattre dans les peuplements forestiers de bois de feuillus assujettis au système de sélection. Jean-Martin Lussier du CCFB a présenté aux participants le modèle dynamique en mettant en relief ses éventuelles fonctions. Le groupe a pu examiner les résultats du modèle en fonction d’une liste d’arbres et de données de peuplement provenant du site de recherche Parkside Gully dans le parc Algonquin. Il s’agit de la plus longue étude sélective d’arbres individuels au Canada, où quatre cycles de coupe successifs ont été réalisés. En l’appliquant aux lignes directrices de l’Ontario pour le marquage des arbres, le modèle Biolley (appliqué sans contraintes) pointait vers l’abattage d’arbres de meilleure qualité et le maintien d’arbres de qualité inférieure. L’autre différence majeure tenait au traitement réservé au bois de perche (polewood). En effet, le guide de marquage des arbres de l’Ontario recommande d’éliminer le bois de perche de mauvaise qualité, alors que le modèle de Biolley propose de préserver l’ensemble du bois de perche. Les membres du groupe ont ensuite visité le site de sélection des arbres individuels de Daventry Road afin de comparer chacun des systèmes dans la zone de peuplement.

Le comité a recommandé trois volets à améliorer relativement au modèle Biolley, soit des améliorations sur le plan financier, la prise en compte de la classification du site et l’instauration d’exigences en matière de durabilité. On en est venu à la conclusion qu’il était possible d’appliquer le modèle de Biolley en Ontario, notamment pour faciliter l’intégration de certains aspects financiers relativement au processus de marquage des arbres, soit un aspect qui demeure négligé dans le système actuel. Les gestionnaires forestiers ont la possibilité d’utiliser le modèle Biolley en vue de réaliser une structure de peuplement idéale au terme de plusieurs abattages.

Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements au sujet du modèle Biolley appliqué au bois de feuillus, veuillez communiquer avec :

Jean-Martin Lussier, Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois – RNCan

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

haute de la page

11) Conférence interprovinciale 2012 sur les forêts boréales mixtes

Edmonton (Alberta) – 17-20 juin

Du 17 au 20 juin, la ville d’Edmonton (Alberta) accueillait la conférence « Forêts boréales mixtes – Écologie, gestion et valeurs diverses », qui a réuni plus de 120 délégués de partout au Canada. L’activité constituait un excellent forum pour échanger et présenter les connaissances actuelles relativement à l’écologie et à la gestion des zones et des peuplements mixtes en vue d’atteindre divers objectifs sur le plan écologique, social et économique. On s’y intéresse également aux possibilités émergentes pour l’amélioration de la valeur des produits qui sortent de ces forêts. La conférence était chapeautée par le Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois de Ressources naturelles Canada ainsi que par l’Université de l’Alberta, grâce à la commandite de plusieurs organismes, dont l’Institut forestier du Canada (section de Rocky Mountain) et le groupe de travail sur l’écologie forestière de l’Institut. Au programme : conférenciers, documents des bénévoles, séances de discussion et présentation par affiches (bénévoles).

Les forêts mixtes constituent un volet important et prépondérant de la forêt boréale canadienne, et ce, sur le plan écologique et économique. Depuis vingt ans, les chercheurs et les gestionnaires forestiers ont acquis beaucoup de connaissances au sujet de l’écologie et de la gestion des forêts boréales mixtes. La conférence donnera lieu, notamment, à une série de présentations en ligne prévues à la fin de l’été, ainsi qu’à un numéro de la revue The Forestry Chronicle voué à la forêt boréale mixte (vers le milieu de 2013).

Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements au sujet de la conférence, cliquez ici.

haute de la page

12) Formation sur le système ontarien de classification écologique des terres

Mattawa (Ontario) – 26-29 juin

À la fin de juin, des employés du MRN ainsi que des forestiers, des planificateurs, des biologistes des espèces menacées, du personnel du secteur des énergies renouvelables, des techniciens des zones humides et des stagiaires du PRF et de l’IFC se sont rassemblés au Centre écologique du Canada à l’occasion d’une formation sur le système ontarien de classification écologique des terres (CET). Ces séances particulières étaient proposées aux membres du personnel des régions du centre et de l’est de l’Ontario dans le cadre d’une série de formations qui ont été organisées à l’échelle de la province en appui au programme.

Le cours offrait aux participants un aperçu de la nouvelle CET provinciale, y compris en ce qui touche au nouvel inventaire des ressources forestières dans la zone d’exploitation. La formation mettait l’accent sur les concepts de base et les compétences requises pour les utilisateurs et les intervenants en lien avec la CET. La séance était divisée en deux leçons théoriques et pratiques touchant à la classification des sols, de la végétation et des écosites. D’une durée de quatre jours, la formation abordait les principaux concepts de la CET provinciale ainsi que sa structure, ses produits et son utilisation, en plus de couvrir l’évaluation des sols et des substrats, les moyens d’identification des écosites sur le terrain, le développement de types de végétation, diverses applications pour l’inventaire et la collecte de données, ainsi que l’interprétation des ressources naturelles.

Mattawa 2012

Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements au sujet des séances de formation sur la CET, veuillez communiquer avec Peter Uhlig ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) ou Monique Wester ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).

haute de la page

13) Mise à jour concernant la série de conférences en ligne

Rétrospective et perspectives d'avenir : l’histoire vivante des forêts canadiennes

Notre présente série de conférences nationales en ligne intitulée « La forêt sur votre bureau » tire à sa fin. Pendant deux mois, cette série a proposé des présentations de la part de nos quatre sociétés historiques forestières canadiennes, d’historiens et d’autres amateurs d’histoire à l’échelle nationale. Si vous avez raté l’une ou l’autre d’entre elles, celles-ci son archivées dans une section particulière de notre site Web.

Cliquez ici pour visionner l’affiche promotionnelle et les détails pertinents.

Forêts boréales mixtes – Écologie, gestion et valeurs diverses

Les forêts mixtes constituent un volet important et prépondérant de la forêt boréale canadienne, et ce, sur le plan écologique et économique. Restez à l’affût de notre prochaine présentation dans le cadre de la série de conférences en ligne « La forêt sur votre bureau » du PRF et de l’IFC, laquelle reprendra certaines présentations offertes dans le cadre de la Conférence 2012 sur les forêts boréales mixtes qui s’est tenue à Edmonton (Alberta) au printemps. Cette série est présentée du 8 août au 26 septembre et couvre divers aspects, qu’il s’agisse des « incidences des coupes partielles dans les peuplements à dominante de trembles dans les régions limitrophes de l’est des forêts boréales mixtes » ou encore de la « dynamique de croissance des trembles et des épinettes juvéniles ».

Pour vous inscrire à l’une ou à l’ensemble des conférences en ligne, veuillez communiquer avec :

Dan Marina

Courriel : This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

haute de la page

14) Gagnant du prix de la ressource la plus précieuse du MRN

À la fin de juin, l'un des bénévoles dévoués du PRF et un membre de l’IFC depuis longtemps, Fred Pinto, Coordonnateur par intérim de l'Unité de surveillance terrestre du ministère des ressource naturelles, aux sections des sciences et de l'information à North Bay a été honorée par la distinction de la réception d'un ministère à l'échelle Prix ​​MRN ressource la plus précieuse dans la catégorie du leadership.

Six prix sont décernés sur une base annuelle dans diverses catégories, y compris le leadership, et ils aident à reconnaître et remercier les employés qui ont apporté une contribution exceptionnelle dans le milieu de travail à l'appui de l'exécution du mandat du ministère et ont démontré leur engagement envers l'excellence. Cette année, Fred a été reconnu pour inspirer les autres à réaliser leur plein potentiel. Son vision, son attitude positive, l'intégrité, l'enthousiasme et l'engagement à «faire droit» encourage les autres à fournir des produits de haute qualité et des services qui favorisent la durabilité des forêts, un mandat qui est essentiel pour l'intégrité écologique, sociale, économique et le bien-être des Ontariennes et Ontariens.

fred


Fred fait du bénévolat avec l'Institut forestier du Canada (IFC) pour les plus de 30 ans. Il a servi sur les comités des sections come directeur et étais président de l'Institut, en fin de compte servir un mandat de quatre ans sur l'exécutif national. Fred a contribué à moderniser les activités de l'Institut de communication sous la forme de la formation continue et de nouveaux programmes de perfectionnement professionnel, y compris une série de conférences électronique national en se concentrant sur tous les choses forestiers. Fred consacre une grande partie de son temps à l'enseignement des jeunes professionnels de la forêt, l’aidant à développer une compréhension large et équilibrée de la foresterie. Il a personnellement supervisé les camps annuels des Maîtrise en foresterie de l'Université de Toronto basés au Centre écologique du Canada, depuis 14 ans et a enseigné des sujets liés à la forêt à l'Université Nipissing et du Collège Algonquin. Son travail local avec le Laurier Woods et le Nipissing Naturalists Club est également reconnu par beaucoup comme exceptionnelle. En reconnaissance de ses activités de bénévolat, Fred a récemment été nominé pour le prix des Nations Unies héros des forêts.

Félicitations à Fred sur son attribution récente et pour toujours être un leader par l'exemple dans son engagement envers la gestion de l'Ontario des ressources naturelles.

haute de la page

15) Présentation no 8 de la série spéciale de conférences en ligne : « Forêts sans frontières »

La prochaine présentation de la série spéciale de conférences en ligne s’intitule « Forêts sans frontières : partager les compétences, les connaissances et les outils pour les intervenants du développement durable outre-frontières ». Cette nouvelle présentation s’intéresse à trois projets entrepris par le volet caritatif de l’IFC, soit Forêts sans frontières. Branchez-vous pour prendre la mesure de nos efforts en Zambie, en Haïti et au Népal.

Cliquez ici pour visionner l’affiche promotionnelle de la conférence.

Pour vous inscrire à l’une ou à l’ensemble des conférences en ligne, veuillez communiquer avec :

Matt Meade

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

haute de la page

16) Tournée annuelle des enseignants en foresterie

L’année 2012 marquera la 11e édition de la Tournée annuelle des enseignants en foresterie, présentée par l’Institut forestier du Canada au Centre écologique du Canada près de Mattawa (Ontario). Chaque année, les enseignants de toutes les régions de la province prennent part à la tournée des enseignants pour en apprendre davantage et découvrir de nouvelles perspectives au sujet du secteur forestier, ou pour s’informer quant aux pratiques mises en œuvre pour la gestion durable des forêts. On y présente aux enseignants tous les aspects de la foresterie moderne, qu’il s’agisse de la recherche dans le domaine (dans le cadre d’une visite au site de recherche sur la concurrence des pins blancs de McConnell Lakes) ou des produits novateurs tirés de la forêt (par le biais d’une visite à la scierie Tembec de Témiscaming, au Québec). Les enseignants en apprendront également davantage au sujet des années de planification et de recherche qui sont nécessaires pour en arriver à la rédaction d’un plan de gestion forestière. De fait, les enseignants sont souvent surpris des recherches continues qui ont cours dans la province, et par la passion que démontrent les professionnels voués à la recherche des meilleures méthodes de gestion des forêts ontariennes. Plusieurs des participants sont des enseignants de la région du sud de Barrie, et ceux-ci arrivent avec une idée préconçue de la foresterie fortement influencée par les médias. L’objectif de la tournée est de leur offrir une perspective équilibrée du secteur forestier en Ontario, et de veiller à ce qu’ils disposent des outils requis pour retransmettre cette information dans leurs classes. Les enseignants repartent donc avec les renseignements et les expériences acquises au cours de la semaine, mais aussi avec en main un bon nombre de ressources pédagogiques et une liste de personnes-ressources auxquelles ils pourront recourir dès leur retour pour alimenter les échanges au sujet du domaine forestier.

Une autre belle semaine s’annonce pour les enseignants des quatre coins de l’Ontario. Restez à l’affût pour nos mises à jour à la fin de l’été ou au début de l’automne 2012.

Cliquez ici pour visionner l’affiche promotionnelle.

haute de la page

17) Conférence sur les espèces végétales terrestres envahissantes : comprendre l’envahissement végétal dans un monde en mutation

Sault Ste. Marie (Ontario) – 20-22 août

En collaboration avec l’Université Algoma, le MRNO, le Conseil sur les plantes envahissantes de l'Ontario et la Fédération des chasseurs et pêcheurs de l’Ontario, l'Institut de recherche sur les espèces envahissantes (IREE) organise, en août 2012, une conférence sur les espèces végétales terrestres envahissantes. Cette conférence sera axée sur les résultats scientifiques pertinents en Ontario, ainsi que sur les enjeux contemporains liés aux espèces végétales terrestres envahissantes de même qu’aux aspects écologiques et biologiques des espèces microbiennes connexes.

Cliquez ici pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements

haute de la page

18) Anciennes présentations de l’IRFO disponibles en ligne

Saviez-vous que la plupart des conférences de l’IRFO sont admissibles à l’obtention de crédits d’éducation permanente par l’intermédiaire de l’Association des forestiers professionnels de l'Ontario et de l’Institut forestier du Canada?

Cliquez ici pour en savoir davantage!

haute de la page

19) De nouveaux conseils forestiers sur le site Web du PRF

Projet du PRF 130-506 :   Efficacité de la sylviculture du chêne rouge

Projet du PRF 140-501 :   La martre comme indicateur des incidences de l’aménagement intensif des forêts (IFM)

haute de la page

20) Classification écologique des terres en Ontario : une page de ressources maintenant en ligne

Pour consulter les publications, les fiches de renseignements et les rapports les plus récents au sujet de la CET en Ontario, cliquez ici.

 

haute de la page

frp_logo_bi


[SUBSCRIPTIONS]