header

Forestry Research Partnership

E-Newsletter December 2010

 

winter banner 2

 Contents

1) General Manager’s Message

Looking Back:

2) CIF AGM and Conference

3) Ontario Hardwood Tour

4) UofT Tenure Discussion

5) Forest Pest Forum 2010

6)  Kemptville Christmas Forest Seminar

7) Master of Conservation Defences

8) CWFC Forum, Alberta

9) Ontario Forest Health Review

10) FRP Website Updates

11) New TreeTip - Pine marten

Coming up:

12) Inventory Workshop, Kapuskasing

13) New Forest Lichen Guidebook

14) Northwest Boreal Seminar, February

15) CWFC E-lecture series

16) GLSL Forest Science Seminar

 

Contenus du présent numéro 

1) Message du Directeur général

Regard sur le passé: 

2) Conférence de l’IFC

3) Tournée des feuillus

4) Discussion de la tenure à l’Université de Toronto

5) Forum sur la répression des ravageurs forestiers 2010

6)  Session de Noel en foresterie à Kemptville

7) Défense de la maîtrise en conservation des forêts

8) Forum CCFB, en Alberta

9) Annual Forest Health Review en Ontario

10) Mise à jour du site d’internet PRF

11) TreeTips – martre américain

À venir:

12) Atelier d’inventaire à Kapuskasing en janvier

13) Nouveau guide pour les lichens des forêts

14) Session boréal du nord-ouest, le 17 février

15)  La série de conférences électronique du centre canadien des fibre de bois

16) Session de la science des forêts du Grands Lacs et du St. Laurent

1) General Manager’s Message


Good reasons for optimism

It has been quite a year! Of all the things that have happened to date, I would like to focus on two main themes that give cause for hope and optimism as we move into the 2011 – the first is improved listening between past perceived adversaries and the second is greater reliance on independent forest science.

In a previous article it was mentioned forestry is not rocket science because it is in reality much harder than that – largely because of some of the emotional issues that are brought into the decision making process. During 2010 I have spent much of my time working with many different individuals and organizations including mayors concerned about their communities, ENGO’s concerned about the environment, forest product companies concerned about economic viability, First Nations concerned with all of the above, and government agencies that are just trying to make good decisions that somehow meaningfully balance all of these varied concerns.

What has been different this year is that many of these discussions are occurring at the same time and with many of these groups in the same room; and what is most encouraging is that we are learning that we actually share about 95% of the same concerns. The long-held stereotypes are actually breaking down. Everyone seems to agree that we want healthy vibrant communities, especially here in the north. Everyone also wants to have a healthy environment as demonstrated by well functioning ecosystems and the recovery of endangered species and species at risk. We also want our forest industries to be economically healthy, recognizing the positive links to community wellbeing, and even environmental health. Finally, we all desire a better future for First Nations and their communities, achieved in a manner that is respectful of their rights and traditions. We all have much to learn from First Nations, to help us find this balance.
Threaded throughout all of these desires is the consensus that sound science will be one of the main ingredients to help us make the right decisions. Already there is some intriguing information and tools coming out of science and research work relating to challenging issues and topics, including woodland caribou and improved forest inventories. This information will give forest managers much needed independent information to make well informed decisions. As we attempt to make the best decisions on how to manage for endangered species and species at risk, and how to promote a sustainable bio-economy, these tools will be invaluable.

I remain very optimistic that this science based information will be instrumental in helping to show that we can have what we all desire: socially beneficial practices that are environmentally appropriate, and that result in economically viable businesses. I am further encouraged that people and organizations that are now putting their perceived differences aside, and are truly listening to other points of view. Through such cooperative efforts and approaches we should be able to truly help government agencies charged with making tough decisions. The perception by everyone has often been that it has to be win/lose, but there are plausible solutions that can result in a win for everyone. I know this approach is not easy and sometimes it is tempting to resort back to past suspicions and fears. However, as we all go forward into the New Year, I hope that we can remember to celebrate the great progress that has been made to date, and continue to build on that progress to create even more positive results in the future. When we take time out to remember how we have advanced, it will be easier to prevent slipping back into the old roles stereotypes.

In closing, I wish everyone a Merry Christmas and happy holidays! Good health, happiness, and peace of mind as we venture into 2011.

Alan Thorne

General Manager

Forestry Research Partnership


Back to top

 

2) CIF AGM and Conference

cif agm logo

The Canadian Institute of Forestry held their Annual General Meeting and Conference in Jasper Alberta on September 26-29th. Themed "Regional Land-use Planning in a Global Economy", the conference offered presentations from wide variety of experts, and engaging field tours relating to both industrial forestry in the province and land management practices within Jasper National Park. The conference was hosted at the scenic and luxurious Jasper Park Lodge.

For more information on the  conference, click here...

The 2011 AGM and conference will be held in Huntsville, ON September 18-21.

Back to top

3) Not Hard to Talk About Hardwoods

On October 19th-21st the FRP hosted the Ontario Hardwood Management Tour, a cross-provincial gathering on hardwood forest management in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Region bringing together forest professionals from across Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime Provinces. The tour highlighted local practices and fostered discussion and collaboration.

The tour was attended by members of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre, FPInnovations, Quebec Ministry of Natural Resources, Clergue Forest Management, Tembec, Algonquin Forest Authority, Nipissing Forest, and the Nipissing Forest Local Citizens Committee. Presentations were held at the CEC the evening of October 19th, followed by a field tour in the Mattawa area on the 20th. The group visited yellow birch and red oak research sites in Olrig and Phelps townships to explore the effect of varying silvicultural treatments on forest growth and regeneration. The tour concluded in Huntsville on the 21th after visiting research and operational harvest sites within Algonquin Park.

The connections that this event facilitated should serve as building blocks for increased cooperation in hardwood research and management across Eastern Canada.

To access the presentations from this event, click here...

Back to top

4) Competing Visions: What is Best for our Forests?

u of t tenure

In November, the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Forestry hosted a timely panel discussion, entitled “Competing Visions: What is Best for our Forests?,” which examined the Ontario government’s pending decision on who will manage public forests in the province. Sponsored by the Canadian Institute of Forestry, Matt Meade the FRP/CIF’s Forestry Extension Manager was among those who attended the event.

Providing a unique opportunity for open discussion on tenure review, the session served as a platform for the key players to share their thoughts and perspectives, two years into the process. The panellists provided enthusiastic and passionate presentations, addressing their concerns on the proposed provincial forest tenure and pricing system. “Events like this are great, they open the lines of communication and build bridges connecting people from all vantage points,” stated Matt Meade. “The more people who understand and can communicate the needs and wants of all those involved in this complexity tenure review process the better the outcome will be,” he added. The evening concluded with a brief question period from the floor, after which panellists and participants mingled enjoying hors d'oeuvres, wine and intriguing conversation.

To watch the recorded webcast, please visit: http://mediacast.ic.utoronto.ca/20101125-FOF/index.htm

Back to top

5) Forest Pest Management Forum

forest pest mgmt

This year’s annual Forest Pest Management Forum once again brought together professionals and researchers from across the country to discuss insect and fungal threats to our forests. The conference gave experts from each province a chance to bring the group up to speed on the current status of important pest species on their home fronts, and to discuss the national outlook. Northwest Territories was represented for the first time in the Forum’s history, and there were speakers from the United States Department of Agriculture.

Two heavily covered topics were the mountain pine beetle outbreak in BC and Alberta, and the emerald ash borer’s spread throughout Ontario. The CIF and FRP were represented by Matt Meade, Krysta Soulière and Mike Halferty.

Back to top

6) Kemptville Christmas Forest Seminar

The CIF Ottawa Valley Section held its Annual Christmas Forest Seminar in Kemptville, ON on December 15th. The topic of the day was ‘Carbon Markets and Credits’. The event was moderated by Joseph Anwati of the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre and participants enjoyed engaging presentations from the OMNR, Rotherham Forest Consulting, Trees Ontario, Tree Canada and the Eastern Ontario Model Forest. The event wrapped up with audience discussion, and buffet lunch.

Click here for the agenda!

Back to top

7) At the “Cutting Edge” – University of Toronto’s MFC Defend

On December 9th, this year’s Master of Forest Conservation (MFC) class crossed an important threshold, presenting and defending their major projects in front of their peers, professors, Faculty and External Examiners. The culmination of an intensive 16-month program, the nine successful candidates presented  on topics from ethnic community awareness of Ottawa’s urban forest, to herbivory of dog strangling vine by leaf beetles in the south of France, with a diverse and eclectic mix of topics in between. An exciting and interesting day, students impressed audience members demonstrating a clear knowledge and passion for the subject matter presented and an enthusiasm for the road ahead. 

Click here to check out the agenda!

To learn more about the Master of Forest Conservation Program, click here.

Back to top

8) FPInnovations CWFC Forum in Alberta

CIF’s Executive Director John Pineau was present at this year’s FPInnovations Canadian Wood Fibre Forum in Jasper, AB. Click here to read his report on the event...

 

Back to top

9) Ontario’s Forest Health Review

The 34th Annual Forest Health Review was held in Orillia, Ontario this past October. Hosted by Mark Shoreman (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR)) and Krista Ryall (Canadian Forest Service (CFS)), this year’s event was a great success; addressing the current state of forest health conditions across the province. With over 200 participants, it was standing room only, as audience members, including the Forestry Research Partnership’s (FRP/CIF) Forestry Extension Manager, Matt Meade, listen intently to the series of talks presented throughout the day.


Geosmithia morbida

Guest speakers presented on a number of forest pest, some well know to Review goers, like the Sirex woodwasp, the Asian long-horned beetle and the emerald ash borer; and others not so well know like the thousand canker disease currently threatening walnut trees in the eastern United States. Discovered this year in Knoxville, Tennessee thousand canker disease effectively kills infected walnut trees through the combined activity of the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis)  and a canker producing fungus (Geosmithia morbid). With a native range at more northern latitudes in the western U.S., Richard Wilson, the OMNR’s Forest Program Pathologist, quickly pointed out the fact that this disease could easily spread into southern Ontario.

Click here to check out the agenda.

Back to top

10) Website Updates

FRP staff have been working on the website up-to-date.

In order to maintain and promote the FRP’s now 10 year legacy, we have reviewed online material, updated it and brought it in-line with our in-house FRP Library. For each project page, we have sorted all downloadables into categories such as: Papers, Presentations, Tech Notes and Status Reports. Click here for an example.

One new addition to the website is a series of PowerPoint presentations to accompany project 130-106:  Surveys and Training for Logging Damage. The 15 presentations cover a wide variety of topics, including the roles and responsibilities of tree cutters, protecting regeneration and residuals, minimizing damage to soil, hydrology and wetlands, and preventing compaction, erosion and nutrient loss. Click here for the careful logging presentations.

Back to top

11) New TreeTip

treetip banner

The new Pine Marten TreeTip is now available on our website. Click here to download.

Find out about FRP and Forest Co-op’s Pine Marten research here.

Back to top

12) Inventory Workshop 

January 26th, 2011 Kapuskasing ON

brucespruceOn January 26th, 2011 the FRP and CIF Northern Ontario Section will host a forest inventory workshop in Kapuskasing. The workshop is entitled Taking Stock: Inventory Options for Today and Tomorrow. The workshop will cover a variety of inventory topics. Possible topics include Fibre Optimization Cruising , Caribou Inventory, eFRI Stereo-imagery and the use of LiDAR for tasks such as derivation and measurement of crown attributes, diameter and size-class distributions and detecting forest successional stages and ecosite prediction. We have not yet finalized the agenda, but are looking for input from potential participants to gauge interests and needs. Visit www.surveymonkey.com/s/7VTS365 to see the full list and have your say.

The goal of the workshop is to connect researchers and practitioners to ensure effective knowledge and technology transfer and advance inventory practices in the province.

Click here to see the poster. To register, or for more information, contact Mike Halferty – This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
 


Back to top

13) Lichen Guide

A new guide to forest lichens in Ontario is slated to be released next February. This resource is targeted for forest biologists and ecosystem managers, but should prove useful for naturalist, students and anyone intrigued by forest diversity.


For more information, access the report here...

Back to top

14) NW Ontario Boreal Science Session

February 17, 2011 Thunder Bay ON

This coming February the CIF/FRP extension team is heading to Thunder Bay for an afternoon of Northwest Science served up with an evening of camaraderie, conversation and chili. The planned approach aims to showcase the latest and greatest, in northwest forest carbon and biomass science and research. This afternoon technical session will be followed up with an evening social event centered around a chilli cook-off with plenty of time to mingle and mix with Lakehead University students, CIF members, local experts and interested members of the public. While currently in the planning stage, stay tuned for more information on this exciting joint knowledge exchange workshop and CIF NW Ontario section event.

Click here for the agenda!

Back to top

15)The Canadian Wood Fibre Centre’s E-Lecture Series

January 5th - February 23rd, 2011

forest on laptop logo

The CIF/IFC’s “Forest on your Desktop” Electronic Lecture series will get the new decade started of right with an offering from Natural Resource Canada’s, Canadian Wood Fibre Centre. The series of nine Electronic Lectures, beginning January 5th, will feature a number of FRP projects and researchers, providing some insight on value creation in Canada’s forest, from inventory to operations.

Click here for a complete listing of electronic lectures in this series.

Back to top

16) Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Forest Science Seminar

February, 2011 

A GLSL Forest seminar will take place tentatively on February 1st, 2011 in Petawawa Ontario. More details to follow, but highlights will include presentations from regional forest experts and opportunities for professional and social networking. Stay tuned for further info...

Back to top


frp_logo_bi


1) Message du Directeur général


De bonnes raisons d'être optimiste

Il a été toute une année! De toutes les choses qui se sont produites à ce jour, je voudrais mettre l'accent sur deux thèmes principaux qui donnent des raisons d'espérer et de retenir un sentiment d’optimisme lorsque nous entrons dans la période 2011 – en premier, c’est l’amélioration des ententes entre quelques participants perçues comme adversaires dans le passé et deuxièmement, le plus grand recours aux sciences forestières indépendantes.

Dans un article précédent, il a été mentionné que la foresterie n'est pas la science des fusées, car il est en réalité beaucoup plus difficile que celui-là - principalement en raison qu’il y a parfois certains problèmes émotionnels qui sont introduits dans le processus décisionnel. En 2010, j'ai passé beaucoup de mon temps à travailler avec de nombreux individus et organisations différents, y compris les maires préoccupés par leurs communautés, les organisations environnementales non-gouvernementales soucieux de l'environnement, les entreprises de produits forestiers préoccupés par la viabilité économique, les Premières Nations concernées par tout mentionné ci-dessus et plus, et les organismes gouvernementaux qui essayons simplement de faire de bonnes décisions qui, en quelque sorte, formera un équilibre entre tous ces préoccupations de façon significative.

Ce qui a été différent cette année, c'est que beaucoup de ces discussions se déroulent en même temps et avec beaucoup de ces groupes dans la même pièce. De plus, ce qui est très encourageant est que nous apprenons que nous partageons 95% de ces mêmes préoccupations. Les stéréotypes tenus depuis longtemps sont en train de se démancher. Tout le monde semble d'accord que nous voulons des collectivités dynamiques et en santé, surtout ici dans le nord. Tout le monde veut aussi un environnement sain tel que démontré par des écosystèmes qui fonctionnent bien et le rétablissement des espèces en voie de disparition et les espèces en péril. Nous voulons également que nos industries forestières jouissent de profits économiques, tout en reconnaissant les liens positifs au bien-être des collectivités, et même la santé de l'environnement. Enfin, nous souhaitons tous un avenir meilleur pour les Premières Nations et leurs communautés, pour réalisée d'une manière qui soit respectueuse de leurs droits et leurs traditions. Les Premières Nations peuvent nous enseignés beaucoup pour nous aider à trouver cet équilibre.

Fileté à travers de ces désirs est le consensus que la science véritable sera l'un des principaux ingrédients pour nous aider à prendre de bonnes décisions. Il y a déjà quelques renseignements et des outils intéressants issus de la science et des travaux de recherches aux sujets de questions difficiles et d’autres sujets, y compris le caribou des bois et les inventaires en forestiers améliorés. Cette information donnera aux gestionnaires de la forêt les renseignements indépendantes nécessaires pour faire de bonnes décisions compétentes. Comme nous essayons de prendre les meilleures décisions sur la façon de gérer des espèces en péril et les espèces en vue de disparitions, et sur la façon de promouvoir une bio-économie durable, ces outils seront très précieux.

Je reste très optimiste que cette information, fondée sur la science, sera déterminant pour aider à montrer que nous pouvons avoir ce que nous souhaitons tous: des pratiques socialement bénéfiques qui sont écologiques et appropriés, et qui forment des entreprises économiquement viables. Je suis également heureux que plusieurs personnes et organisations sont en train de mettre de côté leurs différences perçues, et sont vraiment à l'écoute d'autres points de vue. Grâce à ces efforts de coopération et ces approches, nous devrions être en mesure de véritablement aider les agences gouvernementales chargées de prendre des décisions difficiles. La perception par tout le monde a souvent été qu'il doit avoir en gagnant et un perdant, mais il existe des solutions plausibles qui peuvent résulter en une situation gagnante pour tout le monde. Je sais que cette approche n'est pas simple et parfois il semble être plus facile de recourir aux soupçons du passé et les inquiétudes. Cependant, comme nous allons tous  vers l'avant dans une nouvelle année, j'espère que nous pouvons nous rappeler de célébrer les grands progrès qui ont été réalisés à ce jour, et de continuer à bâtir sur ces progrès pour créer encore plus de résultats positifs pour l’avenir. Quand nous prenons le temps de se rappeler comment nous avons avancé, il sera plus facile d’éviter le retour des anciens rôles et les stéréotypes.

En terminant, je souhaite à tous un Joyeux Noël et bonnes fêtes! Je vous souhaite la santé, le bonheur et la tranquillité de l’esprit lorsque nous continuerons en 2011.

Alan Thorne

Directeur générale

Partenariat pour la recherché forestière


haut de la page

2)  Conférence annuelle de l’IFC

cif agm logo

L'Institut forestier du Canada ont tenu leur assemblée générale annuelle et conférence à Jasper en Alberta, le 26 au 29 septembre. Sous le thème « Regional Land-use Planning in a Global Economy » la conférence a offert des présentations d'une grande variété d'experts, et des visites sur le terrain intéressants concernant l'industrie forestier dans la province et les pratiques de gestion des terres dans le parc national Jasper. La conférence a été organisée chez la magnifique et luxueuse Jasper Park Lodge.

Pour plus de renseignements sur la conférence, cliquez ici ...

haut de la pge

3)  Ce n’est pas difficile de parler des feuillus

Le 19 au 21 Octobre, le PRF a accueilli la Tournée ontarienne pour la gestion des feuillus, un rassemblement interprovincial sur la gestion des forêts de feuillus dans les régions des Grands Lacs et du St. Laurent. Cette tournée a réunit des professionnels de la forêt de tout l'Ontario, du Québec et les provinces maritimes. La tournée a souligné les pratiques locales et a mis en place beaucoup de discussion et la collaboration.

Des membres du Ministère des richesses naturelles, Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois (CCFB), de FPInnovations, du ministère des ressources naturelles et de la faune, de Clergue Forest Management, de Tembec, de l’Algonquin Forest Authority, de Nipissing Forest, et du Nipissing Forest Local Community Council ont participés à la tournée. Quelques présentations en soirées on eu lieu le 19 octobre au Centre écologique canadienne, suivi d’une visite sur le terrain le jour du 20, dans la région de Mattawa. Le groupe a visité les sites de recherches sur les bouleaux jaunes et les chênes rouges dans les cantons Olrig et Phelps pour explorer l'effet de différentes des traitements sylvicoles sur la croissance et la régénération des forêts. La tournée s'est terminée à Huntsville, le 21 octobre, après une visite aux sites de récoltes en marche et des sites de recherches dans le parc Algonquin.

Les liens facilités par cet événement se rendront services comme des blocs de construction pour augmenter la coopération dans la recherche sur la gestion des feuillus à travers l'Est du Canada.

Pour consulter les présentations de cet événement, cliquez ici ...

haut de la page

4) Visions opposés: Quel est le meilleur pour nos forêts?

u of t tenure

En Novembre, l'Université de Toronto, Faculté de foresterie a accueilli une table ronde, intitulé: « Visions opposés : Quel est le meilleur pour nos forêts? ». Celui-ci a examiné la décision en cours du gouvernement de l'Ontario sur la question des personnes qui vont gérer les forêts publiques de la province. Appuyée par l'Institut forestier du Canada, Matt Meade le gestionnaire de vulagarisation forestière PRF/IFC a été parmi ceux qui ont participé à l'événement.

Une occasion unique pour discuter ouvertement de la révision du le régime ontarien de tenure forestière, la session a servi de plateforme pour les principaux agents à partager leurs réflexions et leurs points de vue, deux années dans le processus. Les intervenants ont apporté des présentations enthousiastes et passionnés qui rapprochaient leurs préoccupations sur le mode de tenure forestière provinciale proposée et le système de tarification. "Des événements comme celui-ci sont super, ils ouvrent les voies de communication et aide la construction de ponts reliant les gens de différentes points de vue», a déclaré Matt Meade. Il a aussi ajouté : «Plus les gens comprennent et peuvent communiquer les besoins et les désirs de tous ceux qui sont impliqués dans ce processus complexe de la révision du régime ontarien de tenure forestière, le meilleur sera le résultat ». La soirée s'est terminée avec une brève période de questions sur place, suivit de temps de grâce ou les panélistes et les participants se mêlaient en appréciant du vin et des discussions forts intéressants.

Pour regarder le webcast enregistré, s'il vous plaît visitez: http://mediacast.ic.utoronto.ca/20101125-FOF/index.htm.

haut de la page

5) Forum sur la répression des ravageurs forestiers 2010

forest pest mgmt

Cette année le forum annuelle sur la répression des ravageurs forestiers a de nouveau réuni des professionnels et des chercheurs de partout à travers le pays pour discuter des menaces d’insectes et des champignons sur nos forêts. La conférence a donné aux experts de chaque province une chance de présenter des recherches courantes sur l’état actuel des espèces importantes de ravageurs sur leurs fronts au groupe, et pour discuter des perspectives nationales. Le Territoires du Nord-Ouest était représenté pour la première fois dans l’histoire du forum, et il y avait des intervenants des États Unies du Département de l’agriculture.

Deux sujets ont été largement couverts : l'infestation du dendroctone du pin ponderosa en Colombie-Britannique et en Alberta, et la propagation de l'agrile du frêne partout en Ontario. L’IFC et le PRF étaient représentés par Matt Meade, Krysta Soulière et Mike Halferty.

haut de la page

6) Assemblé de Noël en foresterie à Kempville

La section Vallée des Outaouais de l’IFC a tenu son assemblé de Noël en foresterie à Kemptville, en Ontario, le 15 décembre. Le sujet du jour était «Les marchés et les crédits de carbone ». L'événement a été animé par Joseph Anwati du Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois (CCFB) et les participants ont apprécié les présentations des membres du Ministère des richesses naturelles de l’Ontario, de Rotherham Forest Consulting, de Trees Ontario, d’Arbres Canada et de La Forêt Modèle de l’Est de l'Ontario. L'événement se termine avec discussion en place, et un déjeuner buffet.

Cliquez ici pour l'ordre du jour!

haut de la page

7) "Avant-garde" - Université de Toronto défense MFC

Le 9 Décembre, les membres de la classe du Master of Forest Conservation (MFC) de cette année a franchi une marche importante - la présentation et la défense de leurs projets majeurs en face de leurs pairs, les professeurs, les examinateurs externe et de leur département. C’est le point culminant d'un programme intensif de 16 mois. Les neufs lauréats ont présenté leurs projets qui incluent des thèmes comme la sensibilisation des communautés ethniques d’Ottawa sur la forêt urbaine, la présence d'herbivore sur une cynanche par les chrysomèles dans le sud de la France et un mélange varié entre les deux. Une journée excitante et intéressante, les étudiants ont bien impressionné l’auditoire et ont démontré une connaissance claire et une passion pour le sujet présenté en plus d’un enthousiasme pour le future.

Cliquez ici pour consulter l'ordre du jour!

haut de la page

8) Forum CCFB, en Alberta

Le directeur général de l’IFC, John Pineau, était présent à cette année pour le Canadian Wood Fibre Forum de FPInnovations à Jasper, en Alberta. Cliquez ici pour lire son rapport sur l'événement ...
 


haut de la page

9) Annual Forest Health Review en Ontario

La 34e édition annuelle de la revue de la santé des forêts, tenue à Orillia, en Ontario, l’octobre dernier était accueillit par Mark Shoreman (Ministère des richesses naturelles de l’Ontario) et Krista Ryall (Service canadien des forêts (SCF)). L'événement de cette année a été un grand succès pour adresser l'état actuel des conditions de la santé des forêts à travers la province. Avec plus de 200 participants, il restait seulement de la place pour se tenir debout, l’auditoire, y compris Matt Meade, le gestionnaire de vulagarisation forestière du PRF et l’IFC, se mit à l’écoutent pour la série de présentations tout au long de la journée.

 
Geosmithia morbida

Les conférenciers invités ont présenté sur de nombreux ravageurs forestiers, plusieurs bien connus par ceux familiers avec les revues scientifiques, comme le sirex européen, le scarabée longicorne asiatique et l'agrile du frêne et d'autres pas si bien connus, comme la maladie du chancre mille qui menacent les noyers dans l'est des États-Unis. Découvert cette année à Knoxville, Tennessee, maladie du chancre mille tue efficacement les noyers infectés par l'activité combinée de l'insecte brindille noyer (Pityophthorus juglandis) et un chancre production champignon (Geosmithia morbid). Avec une aire de répartition naturelle à des latitudes plus au nord dans l'ouest des États-Unis, Richard Wilson, pathologue du programme forestier avec le Ministère des richesses naturelles de l’Ontario, a rapidement souligné le fait que cette maladie pourrait se propager rapidement dans le sud de l'Ontario.

Cliquez ici pour l'ordre du jour!

haut de la page

10)  Mises à jour : Site internet

Le personnel du PRF ont travaillé fort pour continuer la mise à jour du site internet.

Afin de maintenir et de promouvoir l'héritage de 10 ans du PRF, nous avons passe un œil critique sur les documents en ligne pour les mettre à jour et en conformités avec notre bibliothèque interne. Comme nous passons en revue les pages de chaque projet, nous avons organisé tous les documents téléchargeables dans les catégories suivantes: Rapports, Présentations, Notes techniques et Rapport en situation. Cliquez ici pour un exemple.

Un ajout au site internet est une série de présentations PowerPoint pour accompagner les projets 130-106: Surveys and Training for Logging Damage. Les 15 présentations couvriront un large éventail de sujets, y compris les rôles et les responsabilités des coupeurs d'arbres, la protection de la régénération et des résidus, minimisant le dommage aux sols, l'hydrologie et les zones humides, et prévenir le compactage des sols, l'érosion et la perte de nutriments. Cliquez ici pour les présentations mentionnées ci-dessus.

haut de la page

11) TreeTip

treetip banner

Le nouveau Tree Tip pour le martre américain  est maintenant disponible sur notre site web. Cliquez ici pour télécharger le document.

Renseignez-vous sur la recherche passionnante du PRF sur le martre américain ici.

haut de la page

12)  Atelier d’inventaire à Kapuskasing en janvier

brucespruceLe 26 Janvier, le PRF et l’IFC de la section nord ontarienne organisera un atelier d'inventaire forestier à Kapuskasing. L'atelier est intitulé Taking Stock: Inventoryy Options for Today and Tomorrow. L'atelier présentera une variété de sujets d'inventaire, y compris l’optimisation pour la croisière des fibres, l’inventaire de caribou, eFRI stéréo-imagerie et l'utilisation du LiDAR pour plusieurs tâches : la dérivation et la mesure des caractéristiques de la cime, le diamètre ; la distribution par classe de taille ; la détection de stades de succession forestière ; et la prédiction de l'écosite. L'objectif est de joindre les chercheurs et les professionnels pour assurer une connaissance effective, le transfert de technologie et l’avance des pratiques d'inventaire dans la province.

Cliquez ici pour voir l'affiche. Pour vous inscrire ou pour plus d'informations, veuillez contacter Mike Halferty - This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

haut de la page

13) Guide pour les lichens des forêts

Un nouveau guide pour les lichens des forêts de l'Ontario est prévu être publié le prochain février. Une collection créer par certains personnels de l'Université de Guelph, et financé en partie par le Ministères des Richesses Naturelles de l’Ontario, cette ressource est visée pour les biologistes et les gestionnaires d’écosystèmes forestiers, mais devrait aussi se révéler utile pour les naturalistes, les étudiants et quiconque s'intéressent au sujet de la diversité forestière.

Pour plus de renseignements, consulter le rapport ici ...

haut de la page

14) Section Nord-ouest de l’Ontario – Session de la science boréale

Février 17, 2011 Thunder Bay ON

En février, l’IFC et l’équipe d'extension PRF se dirigent vers Thunder Bay pour un après-midi de science du style nord-ouest servi avec une soirée de camaraderie, de conversations et un bon repas. L'approche prévue vise à présenter la recherche le plus récent et impressionnant en carbone des forêts du nord-ouest et de la science et la recherche en biomasse. Cette après-midi technique sera suivi d'une soirée d’événement social centré autour d'un repas de piment rouge avec suffisamment de temps pour rencontrer les étudiants de l'Université Lakehead, le membre de l’IFC, les experts locaux et les membres intéressés du public. En ce moment, la phase de planification a commencé. Restez à l'écoute pour plus de renseignements sur cet atelier d’échange de connaissances communes et de la section NW Ontario de l’IFC.

Cliquez ici pour l'ordre du jour!

haut de la page

15) La série de conférences électronique du CCFB

Janvier 5 - Février 23, 2011 

forest on laptop logo

Les séries de conférences électroniques «forêt sur votre bureau » du CIF/IFC commenceront la nouvelle décennie tout droit avec un offre de Ressources naturelles Canada, le Centre canadien sur la fibre de bois. La première série commencera le 5 janvier avec neuf conférences électroniques qui mettra en vedette un certain nombre de projets et chercheurs du PRF. Cette série offre un aperçu sur la création de valeur ajouté dans les forêts du Canada, de l'inventaire à l'exploitation.

Cliquez ici pour une liste complète des conférences électroniques dans cette série.

haut de la page

16) Session de la science des forêts du Grands Lacs et du St. Laurent

Février 2011

Une session aura lieu en principe le 1er Février 2011 à Petawawa, en Ontario pour souligné les recherches scientifiques en foresterie dans la région des Grands Lacs et du St. Laurent. L’agenda inclura des présentations par des experts en foresterie régionaux, des occasions pour faire des contactes professionnelles et sociaux.  Plus de détails à suivre. Restez à l'écoute ...

haut de la page


frp_logo_bi